DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

Principal Investigator    Kenneth Schmader, M.D.  919-660-7500  kenneth.schmader@duke.edu
Program Administrator    Tammy Boseman  919-660-7502  tammy.boseman@duke.edu
       
CENTER DESCRIPTION

The overall goal of the Duke Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (Duke OAIC) is to support research and training that improves the independence of older Americans. Our primary focus: To understand and optimize reserve and resilience. Our approach is founded on the insight that independence in older adults is related to an individuals ability to withstand or recover from functional decline following acute or chronic health stressors. Our overall strategy for the OAIC is to serve as a sustained resource to our investigators through a broad range of training and research studies; the goal will be to address knowledge gaps in our focus with an emphasis on translational and interdisciplinary research. We recruit and develop early stage investigators in aging research related to our focus and utilize the substantial strengths of the Duke academic and health system environment to advance our focus.

The Duke Pepper Center has been at the forefront of geriatric research and training focused on the development of interventions to improve the functional status of older adults and the support of research that identifies risk factors predictive of functional decline. The Duke Pepper Center originally began its funding as a Geriatric Research and Training Center (GRTC) in 1991. The GRTC was originally funded with three research cores and support for junior faculty and pilot projects, which reflects the organization of the current OAIC structure. One year later, Duke was awarded a Pepper Center and, at the direction of the National Institute on Aging, the two programs were combined into one. Initial Pepper Center support focused on the development of promising interventions to promote the independence of older Americans and faculty development. Since then, the Duke OAIC has produced an impressive portfolio of relevant research and innovations in faculty development.

The specific goals of the Duke Pepper Center are:

  1. To better understand and optimize reserve and resilience in older adults through an integrated research program.
  2. To develop and evaluate new methods that advance the study of reserve and resilience.
  3. To support pilot studies through the PESC that acquire information needed to select or design, more definitive research studies related to the Duke OAIC focus.
  4. To identify and develop the next generation of researchers who will become leaders in aging and geriatrics research related to the Duke OAIC focus.

CORES
Leadership and Administrative Core (LAC)
Leader 1:    Kenneth Schmader, MD   kenneth.schmader@dm.duke.edu
Leader 2:    Harvey J. Cohen, MD    harvey.cohen@dm.duke.edu
Leader 3:    Miriam C. Morey, PhD   miriam.morey@dm.duke.edu
The Leadership and Administrative Core (LAC) provides the scientific leadership and administrative infrastructure to create a robust environment for aging and geriatrics research in our theme. The Leadership and Administrative Core promotes the development of early investigators with interests in aging and geriatrics research and ensures the coordination, integration, funding, and translation of research within the Duke OAIC, a mission that supports our ultimate goal of improving the independence of older adults. The specific aims of the Leadership and Administrative Core are to: 1) To provide overall coordination, integration, and administration of the Duke OAIC. 2) To stimulate, assist, monitor and evaluate the progress of the OAIC towards achieving the research and education goals of the Duke OAIC. 3) To assess scientific opportunities for innovative research in our theme with an emphasis on translational and interdisciplinary research. 4) To utilize and develop resources effectively to meet the goals of the Duke Pepper OAIC.

Research Education Component (REC)
Leader 1:    Kimberly Johnson, M.D.   kimberly.s.johnson@duke.edu
Leader 2:    Cathleen Colon-Emeric, M.D.   colon001@mc.duke.edu
The objective of the Research Education Component is to develop the next generation of researchers who will become leaders in integrating basic science and clinical insights into innovative interventions promoting reserve and resilience in late life. Guided by educators in the Aging Center with nationally recognized expertise in curriculum development and evaluation, the REC measures the impact of OAIC programs on Scholars' career progression using innovative evaluation methods such as nominal group sessions. We have established a close partnership with the Duke Clinical Translational Science Award Center (CTSA) KL2 program to enhance scholar recruitment and to share curriculum and resources; the Duke OAIC REC and CTSA share the same co-leader and project director to facilitate interactions. The School of Medicine offers excellent professional development programs, research leadership training, and grant-writing education and support services that are utilized by our scholars. The specific aims of the Research Education Component are to: 1. Coordinate delivery of aging research curriculum to early investigators across the University. 2. Provide a structure for individualized aging and research mentorship at Duke. 3. Evaluate the effectiveness of aging research across the Duke OAIC.

Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core (PESC)
Leader 1:    Heather E. Whitson, MD   heather.whitson@duke.edu
Leader 2:    William Kraus, MD   william.kraus@duke.edu
The Pilot/Exploratory Studies Core emphasizes physiological reserve at the cell/tissue/organ level, which we hypothesize is a key contributor to resilience at the whole person level. The PESC impacts public health by performing studies that develop knowledge to maintain or recover independence in older Americans, by promoting reserve and resilience in the face of chronic and acute stressors. We use small exploratory pilot monies as a rapid response mechanism to take advantage of cutting edge areas. The PESC solicits and selects high quality pilot studies from across Duke University Medical Center using a rigorous, multi-stage process that incorporates internal and external review. The PESC carefully monitors study progress and assists in the development of larger grant proposals from pilot study findings. The Duke PESC includes several highly innovative features: 1) the Pilot Grants Workshop, developed by OAIC Director Kenneth Schmader and frequently requested in national venues, 2) the inclusion of patient/community representatives on the Review Panel that selects pilots, 3) the Data Integration Working Group, which is a central hub for scientific development, oversight, and translation, and 4) mechanisms that support the science and careers of unfunded pilot study applicants. The specific aims of the Pilot/ Exploratory Studies Core are to: 1. Advance top quality science related to late-life reserve and resilience. 2. Attract and nurture a diverse cadre of outstanding early investigators in aging research or established investigators pursuing promising new directions related to our theme. 3. Build and sustain relationships with critical stakeholders to maximize the impact and translation of the work conducted through this and future OAICs.

Analysis
Leader 1:    Carl F. Pieper, DPH   carl.pieper@dm.duke.edu
Leader 2:    Jane F. Pendergast, Ph.D.   jane.pendergast@duke.edu
The Analysis Core provides specialized expertise in the design, collection, and management of data, and in analytic methodologies. The Analysis Core promotes novel lines of research by developing new methods specifically targeted to detect and measure reserve and resilience. Finally, the Analysis Core supports training objectives by developing fellow and faculty understanding of biostatistics and research methodology—critical areas of the research enterprise that are typically a knowledge gap in basic, translational, and clinical researchers. The Analysis Core works closely with other components of the Duke OIAC to achieve shared goals. The Analysis Core collaborates with the two Resource Cores (Molecular Measures Core and Physical Measures Core) to manage data and perform analyses. The Analysis Core collaborates with OAIC investigators to direct study design and analysis, to insure studies are properly powered and address targeted research questions. Furthermore, the Analysis Core is uniquely positioned to expand studies to evaluate additional or emerging hypotheses, including those that support methodologic investigations in statistical science, a unique goal of this Core. The specific aims of the Analysis Core are to: 1) Provide data management and analytic support to funded and proposed projects, pilots, and junior faculty and OAIC investigations to enable research and to address hypotheses within our theme. 2) Develop and disseminate analytic methodologies in biostatistics to advance the study of resilience and reserve. 3) Provide training and mentoring to the fellows and faculty in the Duke OAIC.

Molecular Measures Core
Leader 1:    Virginia B. Kraus, MD, PhD   vbk@duke.edu
Leader 2:    James Bain, PhD   james.bain@duke.edu
Molecular profiling can uniquely discover biomarkers, and predict and monitor traits and processes to understand and optimize reserve and resilience. The goal of the Molecular Measures Core is to promote an understanding of the means to optimize whole person reserve and resilience through analyses of molecular factors indicative of cellular and tissue level ability to withstand and recover from stressors. The Molecular Measures Core complements the whole person level analyses offered through the Physical Measures Core and is inter-dependent with the Analysis Core, which is responsible for statistical analysis and modeling of data generated by the Physical Measures Core and Molecular Measures Core. The Molecular Measures Core has extensive molecular profiling capabilities, including, among others: inflammatory, metabolic, tissue matrix, genetic and genomic analyses. The Molecular Measures Core has capabilities to expand and adapt existing core capabilities to facilitate the many needs of the novel investigator-initiated research projects affiliated with our Duke OAIC. The specific aims of the Molecular Measures Core are to: 1) Perform molecular analyses to support and assist research projects of the Duke OAIC. 2) Develop new molecular profiling and testing capabilities to evaluate cellular, tissue, and organ resiliencies. 3) Perform systems pathway analyses to identify biological pathways indicative of resilient phenotypes. 4) Serve as a resource for research-oriented advice and training on principles and methods of molecular analyses.

Physical Measures
Leader 1:    Miriam C. Morey, PhD   miriam.morey@dm.duke.edu
Leader 2:    Katherine Hall, Ph.D.   katherine.hall@duke.edu
The Physical Measures Core serves as the central resource for Center investigators seeking advice, training, laboratory access, and equipment for valid, sensitive, and reliable physical/ no biological measures. A panel of 13 members, with complementary expertise in measurement across multiple domains, comprises the Core and provides highly integrated, customized support to investigators supported by our Research Education Component, Pilot/Exploratory Studies Core, Externally Funded Projects, and the larger Duke Community engaged by the Duke OAIC. The PMC supports investigators by meeting regularly throughout the full spectrum of project development, from early phase planning, to final interpretation of findings, to subsequent grant preparations, to dissemination and/or implementation. These meetings concurrently involve members of the Analysis and Molecular Measures Cores to assure maximal synergy. The specific aims of the Physical Measures Core are to: 1) Provide centralized expertise available for consultation on the measurement of reserve and resilience. 2) Develop measurement protocols and train personnel in administration and data collection. 3) Identify gaps in resiliency measures and develop or adapt innovative new measurement approaches across the adult lifespan for related outcomes.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT
REC Scholar, Research & Grants Funded During Pepper Supported Time Years Publications
 

None specified.

Past Scholars
Corey Simon, Orthopaedic Surgery (2018-2020)
Nazema Siddiqui, MD, MHS, Obstetrics and Gynecology (2018-2020)
Anthony Sung, MD, Senior Fellow in the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Institutes and Centers (2018-2020)

PILOT/EXPLORATORY PROJECTS (4 Pilot Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: Focused Geriatric Assessment in Older Adults with Sickle Cell Disease
  Leader: J John Strouse MD and Charity Oyedeji MD
 

The study’s objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting geriatric assessment and resilience phenotyping in 20 older (age 50+ years) SCD patients.  Resilience is phenotyped with repeat geriatric assessment and actigraphy after the stressor of hospitalization. The study will characterize the feasibility and performance characteristics of several potential predictors of resilient outcomes, including physical and molecular biomarkers

 
2. Project Title: Exercise Training in Seniors with CLL: EMPHASIS
  Leader: David Bartlett PHD.
 

Piloting a randomized control study design of 12 weeks of supervised exercise training in CLL.  In this pilot, his team will determine the change in physical reserve measures (strength and aerobic capacity) in the intervention arm (target n=10) and control group (target n=10) and determine whether these changes relate to immunological mediators thought to be associated with better resilience to CLL.

 
3. Project Title: Metabolic Modifiers and Rehabilitation Phenotypes in Older Adults Subjected to Extracorporeal Support (METAMORPHOSES
  Leader: Mihai Podgoreanu MD
 

This study focuses on the Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator (ECMO) patient population as a unique investigational model to understand the biological principles of resilience and recovery from critical illness. He and his team hoped to enroll 20 of these critically ill individuals to collect and store blood at the time of ECMO initiation for metabolic biomarkers and complete repeated measures of function to estimate functional trajectories.

 
4. Project Title: Mediators of the Age-related Decline in Recovery of Aging Hepatocytes to Toxins
  Leader: Anna Mae Diehl MD
 

A Rapid Response Exploratory award was given to the laboratory of Dr. Anna Mae Diehl to support their work on mediators of the age-related decline in recovery of aging hepatocytes to toxins.  We awarded her post-doc $5000 to purchase reagents and supplies to conduct her experiment. Of even greater value, we were able to facilitate her access to aged mice from NIA in support of the work. 

 
DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (2 Development Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: Cellular senescence burden as a molecular indicator of resilience
  Leader: Virginia Kraus, MD, PHD
  Core(s):
 

Stress elicits the Senescence Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) and the upregulation of lysosomal hydrolases. These cellular senescence responses have recently been discovered to be physiological tissue repair and remodeling responses. The complex systems of tissue repair and remodeling comprise the molecular foundation for resilience. These recent exciting insights define a beneficial role in tissue repair for SASP, the increased expression and secretion of a suite of inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and proteases. When senescence reverts from an acute and transient state, such as in wound healing, to a chronic state with accumulation of senescent cells, the well-known phenomena of aging, including loss of reserve and resilience, are observed. In fact, the SASP is very similar to the inflammatory and coagulation markers associated with frailty and mortality in the elderly. Clearance of senescent cells in mouse models reduces expression of SASP factors in tissue and delays aging. The Specific Aims of this project are: Aim 1) To develop a panel of molecular markers indicative of senescent cell burden based on markers associated with SASP, soluble lysosomal exoglycosidases able to be detected in serum that might be a marker of a senescence process, and microRNAs we identified, through Duke OAIC pilot funding, as associated in elders with high function and longevity; and Aim 2) To evaluate the expression and interdependence of these factors in an in vitro model system followed by analyses of these factors in the CALERIE cohort and, in future in the collaborating Duke OAIC projects

 
2. Project Title: Testing the resilience of the latent class trajectory model when the conditions of the model are not met
  Leader: Carl Pieper, Dr. PH and Jane Pendergast, PhD
  Core(s):
 

The objective of this project is to examine factors which impact the validity of latent class trajectory model results / Generalized mixed models in the presence violations of the model assumptions.  In initial analyses, we were surprised by the magnitude and implications of the results.  Specifically, in mis-specification of the error structure of the replicate observations led to mis-classification of the number of classes contained in the data. The mis-classification occurred even in the presence of small correlations (0.1).  These findings have implications for the statistical packages used in the field.  We demonstrated this both in simulations, where external factors could be controlled, and in real data. 

 
RESEARCH (27 Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: PHYSICAL RESILIENCE PREDICTION IN ADVANCED RENAL DISEASE
  Leader(s): BOWLING, CHRISTOPHER BARRETT
    DURHAM VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01HX002704 / (2019-2023)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACTBackground: Older Veterans with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) face complex decisions to initiateor forgo dialysis in the context of uncertainty about their future health and physical function. Making thesedecisions is complicated by the course of advanced CKD which is characterized by frequent health events thatfurther worsen function. Decisions support tools are needed that are sp...
 
2. Project Title: EXPLORING THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON PTSD SYMPTOMS AND PHYSICAL HEALTH IN OLDER VETERANS WITH PTSD
  Leader(s): HALL, KATHERINE SHEPARD
    DURHAM VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX003120 / (2020-2024)
  Core(s):
  Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent among military Veterans, and affects over 30% of older, Vietnam-era Veterans. These servicemembers have endured nearly 40 years with these symptoms, and as a result, have significantly poorer health, higher rates of chronic disease and obesity, and an excess mortality rate 3 times higher than the general population. Clearly PTSD is more than just a...
 
3. Project Title: THE AMPK/ULK1/P27KIP1 AXIS REGULATES AUTOPHAGY AND CELL SURVIVAL IN AGED SATELLITE CELLS
  Leader(s): WHITE, JAMES P.
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH K01AG056664 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  a. Project summary/abstract:Sarcopenia is the age-related loss in skeletal muscle mass and strength; it leads to a host of co-morbiditiesincluding loss of physical function and overall resilience. One such perturbation in persons with sarcopenia isthe diminished ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Muscle stem cells, referred to as satellite cells, arerequired to activate, proliferate and di...
 
4. Project Title: DEPRESCRIBING CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM MEDICATIONS IN HOSPITALIZED OLDER ADULTS
  Leader(s): PAVON, JULIESSA M
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH K23AG058788 / (2019-2024)
  Core(s):
  This K23 Career Development Award in Aging focuses on the development of Dr. Juliessa Pavon, a hospital-based geriatrician, and on reducing central nervous system (CNS) medication use in hospitalized older adults.Dr. Pavon s long-term goal is to improve the resilience of older adults against the acute stressors ofhospitalization. She has built her research program on investigating hazards of hospi...
 
5. Project Title: METABOLOMIC & RADIOGRAPHIC MARKERS OF FRACTURE RISK AMONG OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES
  Leader(s): LEE, RICHARD H.
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH K23AG058797 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACTAmong its medical complications, type 2 diabetes mellitus in older adults is associated with atwo-fold increase in the risk of hip and other low-trauma bone fractures. Paradoxically, thisincreased risk occurs despite a higher average bone mineral density. This increased fracturerisk is likely multifactorial, stemming from metabolic dysfunction that results in both increasedfalls risk and d...
 
6. Project Title: NEURO-INFLAMMATION IN POSTOPERATIVE COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION: CSF AND FMRI STUDIES
  Leader(s): BERGER, MILES
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH K76AG057022 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  This is a K76 Beeson career development award for Dr. Miles Berger, a geriatric neuro-anesthesiologist with a focus on postoperative cognitive disorders. Each year >16 million olderAmericans undergo anesthesia and surgery, and up to 40% of these patients developpostoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a syndrome of postoperative thinking and memorydeficits. Although distinct from delirium, POCD...
 
7. Project Title: DEPRESCRIBING FOR OLDER DIALYSIS PATIENTS
  Leader(s): HALL, RASHEEDA K
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH K76AG059930 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACTThis is a Beeson Emerging Leaders in Aging career development award (K76) for Dr. Rasheeda Hall, MD,MBA, MHS. Dr. Hall is a nephrologist who conducts aging research at Duke University, and her long-term goalis to become a leader in geriatric nephrology and develop effective interventions targeting geriatric conditionsin older dialysis patients. Compared to older adults without kidney disea...
 
8. Project Title: NORTH CAROLINA DIABETES RESEARCH CENTER
  Leader(s): NEWGARD, CHRISTOPHER B
    WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH P30DK124723 / (2020-2021)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT METABOLOMICS CORE Comprehensive metabolic analysis, or metabolomics , is a technology that defines the chemical phenotype of living systems. Given that metabolic fluxes and metabolite levels are downstream of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic variability, metabolomics provides a highly integrated profile of biological status. As such, it has unique potential for di...
 
9. Project Title: AGING IN 1000 HEALTHY YOUNG ADULTS: THE DUNEDIN STUDY
  Leader(s): MOFFITT, TERRIE E; CASPI, AVSHALOM ;
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG032282 / (2009-2020)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Declining fertility rates, aging of the baby-boomers, and increasing life expectancy are leading to population aging. As the population ages, this increases the public-health burden of age-related conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and dementia. Treating un-prevented diseases in late life has proven costly and ineffective. I...
 
10. Project Title: NEURAL SIGNATURES OF HEALTHY AND UNHEALTHY AGING
  Leader(s): HARIRI, AHMAD R; MOFFITT, TERRIE E ;
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG049789 / (2015-2020)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Declining fertility rates, aging of the baby-boomers, and increasing life expectancy are leading to population aging. As the population ages, this increases the public-health impact of age-related conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and dementia. Treating un-prevented diseases in late life has proven costly and ineffective. C...
 
11. Project Title: EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS PROMOTING LONGEVITY
  Leader(s): KRAUS, VIRGINIA
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG054840 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  AbstractCirculating small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (typically ~19-25nt in size). They mediatea broad spectrum of biological processes through regulation of gene expression. Our experimental evidenceindicates that serum levels of miRNAs (one form of sRNA) change considerably, the vast majority increasingwith age. The ability of circulating sRNAs to travel among tissues enab...
 
12. Project Title: GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE CALERIE TRIAL TO GENERATE NEW KNOWLEDGE FOR GEROSCIENCE
  Leader(s): BELSKY, DANIEL WALKER
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH R01AG061378 / (2019-2024)
  Core(s):
  SUMMARYThe graying global population makes interventions to extend healthy lifespan (healthspan) a public heathpriority. Therapies targeting basic biological processes of aging show proof-of-concept in animals: early-to-midlife intervention can delay disease onset and prolong healthspan. But translating these geroprotectivetherapies to humans faces the barrier that human clinical trials of midlife...
 
13. Project Title: FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS AND DISABILITY AMONG MIDDLE-AGED ADULTS
  Leader(s): BOWLING, CHRISTOPHER BARRETT
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG062502 / (2020-2023)
  Core(s):
  Project summary/Abstract The burden of functional limitations (restrictions in basic physical actions) and disability (problems with daily activities and life participation) may be more common in middle-aged US adults than previously recognized. However, studies of middle-age populations have not typically included functional assessments. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDI...
 
14. Project Title: QUALIFICATION OF PROGNOSTIC AND DIAGNOSTIC BIOMARKERS OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS
  Leader(s): KRAUS, VIRGINIA
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AR071450 / (2017-2020)
  Core(s):
  AbstractA cure for osteoarthritis (OA) remains elusive. This is due in large part to two major obstacles, inability todetect OA sufficiently early before the onset of irreversible signs and recalcitrant symptoms, and inability toidentify individuals at high risk of progression based on traditionally used metrics (age, sex, body mass index,knee pain and joint space width). The latter challenge is r...
 
15. Project Title: MECHANOTRANSDUCTION IN MENISCUS HEALTH AND REPAIR
  Leader(s): MCNULTY, AMY L
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AR073221 / (2019-2023)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACT.Meniscal injuries are a significant clinical problem as each year 850,000 meniscal surgeries are performed in theUnited States and nearly twice as many worldwide. Meniscal tears in the avascular inner zone of the tissue donot heal well with suturing or conservative treatments and can ultimately lead to the development of osteoarthritis(OA). Therefore, new strategies are needed to enhance ...
 
16. Project Title: ADHERENCE TO VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS GUIDELINES IN HOSPITALIZED ELDERS
  Leader(s): PAVON, JULIESSA M
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R03AG048007 / (2014-2016)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): There are important public health concerns related to inappropriate use of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis among medically ill hospitalized elderly patients with low risk of VTE occurrence. Specifically, use of anticoagulants (heparin products) for VTE prophylaxis when not medically indicated may be harmful, and is a major patient safety issue that als...
 
17. Project Title: METABOLOMICS OF LOW-TRAUMA FRACTURE AMONG OLDER WOMEN WITH DIABETES
  Leader(s): LEE, RICHARD H.
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R03AG048119 / (2014-2017)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Among its associated medical complications, diabetes is associated with low-trauma bone fracture: Compared to older women without diabetes, older women with diabetes have 2-times the fracture risk. Paradoxically, this increased risk occurs despite diabetic women having a higher average bone mineral density. The long-term goal is to understand how diabetes among...
 
18. Project Title: IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE MEASUREMENT IN OLDER DIALYSIS PATIENTS
  Leader(s): HALL, RASHEEDA K
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R03AG050834 / (2015-2017)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Adults over 75 years of age comprise the fastest growing group receiving dialysis. Unfortunately, many of these patients experience significant functional impairment and declines in quality of life (QOL) after starting dialysis. Because QOL informs treatment decisions (e.g., shared decision-making about dialysis modality, dialysis discontinuation, or...
 
19. Project Title: EFFECTS OF AGING AND THE URINARY MICROBIOME ON RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS
  Leader(s): SIDDIQUI, NAZEMA Y
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R03AG060082 / (2018-2020)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most commonly diagnosed infections in olderadults. UTIs cost $1.6 billion annually, impair health-related quality of life, and can have serioussequellae such as hospitalization, sepsis, or death. At all ages, UTIs are more prevalent inwomen than men, with up to 50% of all women experiencing a UTI during their lifetime. Theinci...
 
20. Project Title: A PILOT STUDY TO ADVANCE TRANSLATION OF MOLECULAR SIGNATURES OF BIOLOGICAL AGING
  Leader(s): BELSKY, DANIEL WALKER
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH R21AG054846 / (2017-2020)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARYThe broad aim of this proposal is to determine if any of several proposed methods to quantify biological agingin humans are promising for use in trials of interventions to increase healthy lifespan. The biological processof aging is thought to drive risk for many disabling health conditions and mortality. There is evidence thattrajectories of aging begin to diverge as early in life ...
 
21. Project Title: EVALUATING EFFECTS OF AGE-RELATED MICROBIOTA MODULATIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT PATIENTS
  Leader(s): SUNG, ANTHONY; CHAO, NELSON J. ;
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R21AG066388 / (2019-2021)
  Core(s):
  Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) has the potential to cure patients with hematologicmalignancies. However, HCT is associated with significant treatment related mortality (TRM) ranging from 20-30%. (1). TRM is particularly high in patients with advanced age (hazard ratio 1.84, age >60 years vs. <20) anddecreased physical function (hazard ratio 2.94, bottom quartile vs. top quarti...
 
22. Project Title: DEVELOPING RESEARCH AT THE INTERFACE OF HIV AND AGING
  Leader(s): HIGH, KEVIN P.
    WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH R24AG044325 / (2013-2019)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in many people with chronic HIV surviving into middle and old age. However, even those with controlled HIV viral replication, are more likely than uninfected subjects to experience premature chronic illness, multi-morbidity and functional decline. For example, 58% of HIV- infected subjects age >= 50 years have...
 
23. Project Title: EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS PROMOTING LONGEVITY
  Leader(s): KRAUS, VIRGINIA
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R56AG054840 / (2017-2018)
  Core(s):
  AbstractCirculating sRNAs are short non-coding RNAs (typically ~19-25nt in size). They mediate a broad spectrum ofbiological processes through regulation of gene expression. Experimental evidence indicates that the serumlevels of sRNAs change considerably--the vast majority increasing with age. The ability of circulating miRNAsto travel among tissues enables them to transmit signals and regulate a...
 
24. Project Title: EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES AND THEIR ROLE IN HALLMARKS OF AGING
  Leader(s): KRAUS, VIRGINIA
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH R56AG060895 / (2018-2019)
  Core(s):
  AbstractExtracellular vesicles (EVs) are membranous particles released from nearly all cell types into all bodily fluidsevaluated to date including serum and plasma. Depending on tissue of origin, health state and organismage, they carry a variety of complex cargo consisting of nucleic acids (5,000 microRNA documented to date),proteins (93,000 documented to date including cytokines) and metaboli...
 
25. Project Title: MOLECULAR TRANSDUCERS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH: NC CONSORTIUM CLINICAL SITE
  Leader(s): KRAUS, WILLIAM E; HOUMARD, JOSEPH A ; NICKLAS, BARBARA J ;
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH U01AR071128 / (2016-2022)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACT Exercise is a powerful physiological stimulus contributing to disease prevention and intervention. Theprotective and preventive effects of exercise are well-documented for metabolic, neurodegenerative, andcardiovascular diseases, and certain cancers. While scientists acknowledge the extensive benefits ofexercise, there is still insufficient understanding about the underlying mechanisms by...
 
26. Project Title: PHYSICAL RESILIENCIES: INDICATORS AND MECHANISMS IN THE ELDERLY COLLABORATIVE
  Leader(s): COLON-EMERIC, CATHLEEN S; WHITSON, HEATHER E. ;
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH UH2AG056925 / (2017-2019)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACTThe overarching objectives of the PRIME Collaborative (Physical Resilience: Indicators and Mechanisms inthe Elderly) are to characterize specific resilience phenotypes, elucidate biological mechanisms, and validateclinically valuable predictive tools and measures of physical resilience. The application focuses on resilience inthree systems that are central to older adults' overall health: ...
 
27. Project Title: PHYSICAL RESILIENCIES: INDICATORS AND MECHANISMS IN THE ELDERLY COLLABORATIVE
  Leader(s): COLON-EMERIC, CATHLEEN S
    DUKE UNIVERSITY
    NIH UH3AG056925 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  ABSTRACTThe overarching objectives of the PRIME Collaborative (Physical Resilience: Indicators and Mechanisms inthe Elderly) are to characterize specific resilience phenotypes, elucidate biological mechanisms, and validateclinically valuable predictive tools and measures of physical resilience. The application focuses on resilience inthree systems that are central to older adults' overall health: ...
 
PUBLICATIONS
2021
 
2020
  1. Meteorin-like facilitates skeletal muscle repair through a Stat3/IGF-1 mechanism.
    Baht GS, Bareja A, Lee DE, Rao RR, Huang R, Huebner JL, Bartlett DB, Hart CR, Gibson JR, Lanza IR, Kraus VB, Gregory SG, Spiegelman BM, White JP
    Nat Metab, 2020 Mar, 2(3): 278-289
    https://doi.org/10.1038/s42255-020-0184-y | PMID: 32694780 | PMCID: PMC7504545
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 20.25
  2. Rejuvenation of Neutrophil Functions in Association With Reduced Diabetes Risk Following Ten Weeks of Low-Volume High Intensity Interval Walking in Older Adults With Prediabetes - A Pilot Study.
    Bartlett DB, Slentz CA, Willis LH, Hoselton A, Huebner JL, Kraus VB, Moss J, Muehlbauer MJ, Spielmann G, Muoio DM, Koves TR, Wu H, Huffman KM, Lord JM, Kraus WE
    Front Immunol, 2020, 11: 729
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.00729 | PMID: 32431698 | PMCID: PMC7214668
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 7.95
  3. Of Parachutes, Speedometers, and EEG: What Evidence Do We Need to Use Devices and Monitors?
    Berger M, Mark JB, Kreuzer M
    Anesth Analg, 2020 May, 130(5): 1274-1277
    https://doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000004653 | PMID: 32287134 | PMCID: PMC7735682
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 1.5
  4. A comparison of antibiotic prophylaxis regimens to decrease the risk of post-procedure urinary tract infection after onabotulinum toxin A injection.
    Bickhaus JA, Vaughan M, Truong T, Li YJ, Siddiqui NY
    Int Urogynecol J, 2020 Sep, 31(9): 1907-1912
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-020-04230-7 | PMID: 31989204 | PMCID: PMC7498079
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  5. Machine Learning Algorithms to Predict Mortality and Allocate Palliative Care for Older Patients With Hip Fracture.
    Cary MP Jr, Zhuang F, Draelos RL, Pan W, Amarasekara S, Douthit BJ, Kang Y, Col?n-Emeric CS
    J Am Med Dir Assoc, 2020 Oct 29
    pii: S1525-8610(20)30822-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2020.09.025 | PMID: 33132014
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.25
  6. Synovial cell cross-talk with cartilage plays a major role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.
    Chou CH, Jain V, Gibson J, Attarian DE, Haraden CA, Yohn CB, Laberge RM, Gregory S, Kraus VB
    Sci Rep, 2020 Jul 2, 10(1): 10868
    https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67730-y | PMID: 32616761 | PMCID: PMC7331607
    Citations: | AltScore: 4.35
  7. Succeeding in Aging Research During the Pandemic: Strategies for Fellows and Junior Faculty.
    Cohen AB, Parks AL, Whitson HE, Zieman S, Brown CJ, Boyd C, Covinsky KE, Steinman MA
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Oct 13
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16868 | PMID: 33047812 | PMCID: PMC7675665
    Citations: | AltScore: 47.5
  8. Cost trajectories as a measure of functional resilience after hospitalization in older adults.
    Col?n-Emeric CS, Huang J, Pieper CF, Bettger JP, Roth DL, Sheehan OC
    Aging Clin Exp Res, 2020 Feb 14, 32(12): 2595-2601
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-020-01481-8 | PMID: 32060803 | PMCID: PMC7426235
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  9. Pain-Reducing Effects of Physical Therapist-Delivered Interventions: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials Among Older Adults With Dementia.
    Coronado RA, Albers HE, Allen JL, Clarke RG, Estrada VA, Simon CB, Galloway RV, Fisher SR
    J Geriatr Phys Ther, 2020 Jul/Sep, 43(3): 159-169
    https://doi.org/10.1519/JPT.0000000000000235 | PMID: 30998563 | PMCID: PMC6800767
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2.75
  10. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Patients Who Develop Mucosal Barrier Injury-Laboratory Confirmed Bloodstream Infections in the First 100 Days After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.
    Dandoy CE, Kim S, Chen M, Ahn KW, Ardura MI, Brown V, Chhabra S, Diaz MA, Dvorak C, Farhadfar N, Flagg A, Ganguly S, Hale GA, Hashmi SK, Hematti P, Martino R, Nishihori T, Nusrat R, Olsson RF, Rotz SJ, Sung AD, Perales MA, Lindemans CA, Komanduri KV, Riches ML
    JAMA Netw Open, 2020 Jan 3, 3(1): e1918668
    https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.18668 | PMID: 31913492 | PMCID: PMC6991246
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 19.7
  11. Hospitalization Risk Among Older Adults with Sensory Impairments: Development of a Prognostic Model.
    Deardorff WJ, Sloane RJ, Pavon JM, Hastings SN, Whitson HE
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Aug 27, 68(11): 2650-2655
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16800 | PMID: 32852787
    Citations: | AltScore: 14.2
  12. High Prevalence of Fall-Related Medication Use in Older Veterans at Risk for Falls.
    Elias AM, Ogunwale AN, Pepin MJ, Bailey JC, Adams AD, Col?n-Emeric CS, Vognsen JD, Schmader KE, Pavon JM
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Feb, 68(2): 438-439
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16233 | PMID: 31657005 | PMCID: PMC7002268
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 25.3
  13. Determinants of Maintenance and Recovery of Function in a Representative Older Community-Resident Biracial Sample.
    Fillenbaum GG, Sloane R, Burchett BM, Hall K, Pieper CF, Whitson HE, Col?n-Emeric CS
    J Am Med Dir Assoc, 2020 Feb 6, 21(8): 1141-1147.e1
    pii: S1525-8610(19)30891-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2019.12.021 | PMID: 32037299 | PMCID: PMC7396287
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  14. Multi-omics analyses of radiation survivors identify radioprotective microbes and metabolites.
    Guo H, Chou WC, Lai Y, Liang K, Tam JW, Brickey WJ, Chen L, Montgomery ND, Li X, Bohannon LM, Sung AD, Chao NJ, Peled JU, Gomes ALC, van den Brink MRM, French MJ, Macintyre AN, Sempowski GD, Tan X, Sartor RB, Lu K, Ting JPY
    Science, 2020 Oct 30, 370(6516):
    pii: eaay9097. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aay9097 | PMID: 33122357
    Citations: | AltScore: 221.29
  15. Systematic review of the prospective association of daily step counts with risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and dysglycemia.
    Hall KS, Hyde ET, Bassett DR, Carlson SA, Carnethon MR, Ekelund U, Evenson KR, Galuska DA, Kraus WE, Lee IM, Matthews CE, Omura JD, Paluch AE, Thomas WI, Fulton JE
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 2020 Jun 20, 17(1): 78
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00978-9 | PMID: 32563261 | PMCID: PMC7305604
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 167.7
  16. Unmet Needs of Older Adults Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis: A Qualitative Needs Assessment.
    Hall R, Rutledge J, Col?n-Emeric C, Fish LJ
    Kidney Med, 2020 Sep-Oct, 2(5): 543-551.e1
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xkme.2020.04.011 | PMID: 33094273 | PMCID: PMC7568084
    Citations: | AltScore: 5.15
  17. Physical Function Assessment in Older Hemodialysis Patients.
    Hall RK, Rutledge J, Luciano A, Hall K, Pieper CF, Col?n-Emeric C
    Kidney Med, 2020 Jul-Aug, 2(4): 425-431
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xkme.2020.03.008 | PMID: 32775982 | PMCID: PMC7406854
    Citations: | AltScore: 7.7
  18. A Novel Approach to Developing a Discordance Index for Older Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease.
    Hall RK, Zhou H, Reynolds K, Harrison TN, Bowling CB
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Feb 14, 75(3): 522-528
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz248 | PMID: 31644788
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 10.7
  19. Discharge Information and Support for Patients Discharged from the Emergency Department: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.
    Hastings SN, Stechuchak KM, Coffman CJ, Mahanna EP, Weinberger M, Van Houtven CH, Schmader KE, Hendrix CC, Kessler C, Hughes JM, Ramos K, Wieland GD, Weiner M, Robinson K, Oddone E
    J Gen Intern Med, 2020 Jan, 35(1): 79-86
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-019-05319-6 | PMID: 31489559 | PMCID: PMC6957582
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 18.3
  20. Mobilizing Hospitals to Mobilize Patients.
    Hastings SN, Zullig LL
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Aug 5, 68(10): 2202-2204
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16698 | PMID: 32757213
    Citations: | AltScore: 15
  21. Anti-inflammatory effects of naproxen sodium on human osteoarthritis synovial fluid immune cells.
    Hsueh MF, Bolognesi MP, Wellman SS, Kraus VB
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage, 2020 May, 28(5): 639-645
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2020.01.013 | PMID: 32028022 | PMCID: PMC7214189
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 1
  22. Maresin 1 resolves aged-associated macrophage inflammation to improve bone regeneration.
    Huang R, Vi L, Zong X, Baht GS
    FASEB J, 2020 Oct, 34(10): 13521-13532
    https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.202001145R | PMID: 32794246 | PMCID: PMC7719599
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  23. Faecal microbiota transplantation from metabolically compromised human donors accelerates osteoarthritis in mice.
    Huang Z, Chen J, Li B, Zeng B, Chou CH, Zheng X, Xie J, Li H, Hao Y, Chen G, Pei F, Shen B, Kraus VB, Wei H, Zhou X, Cheng L
    Ann Rheum Dis, 2020 May, 79(5): 646-656
    https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-216471 | PMID: 32205337 | PMCID: PMC7384301
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 3
  24. ?-Cell-specific ablation of sirtuin 4 does not affect nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in mice.
    Huynh FK, Peterson BS, Anderson KA, Lin Z, Coakley AJ, Llaguno FMS, Nguyen TN, Campbell JE, Stephens SB, Newgard CB, Hirschey MD
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 2020 Oct 1, 319(4): E805-E813
    https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00170.2020 | PMID: 32865009
    Citations: | AltScore: 4.45
  25. Accelerometer-Based Machine Learning Categorization of Body Position in Adult Populations.
    Jarvis L, Moninger S, Pavon J, Throckmorton C, Caves K
    Comput Help People Spec Needs, 2020 Sep, 12377: 242-249
    https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-58805-2_29 | PMID: 33047112 | PMCID: PMC7548108
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  26. Development, Validity, and Reliability of a Novel Walking Speed Measurement Device: the GaitBox.
    Jarvis LM, Peterson MJ, Caves KM
    Gait Posture, 2020 Nov 13, 84: 52-57
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2020.11.009 | PMID: 33271417
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  27. Cognitive function prior to systemic therapy and subsequent well-being in older breast cancer survivors: Longitudinal findings from the Thinking and Living with Cancer Study.
    Kobayashi LC, Cohen HJ, Zhai W, Zhou X, Small BJ, Luta G, Hurria A, Carroll J, Tometich D, McDonald BC, Graham D, Jim HSL, Jacobsen P, Root JC, Saykin AJ, Ahles TA, Mandelblatt J
    Psychooncology, 2020 Mar 10, 29(6): 1051-1059
    https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.5376 | PMID: 32154959 | PMCID: PMC7299808
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.25
  28. Defining the relationship between vaginal and urinary microbiomes.
    Komesu YM, Dinwiddie DL, Richter HE, Lukacz ES, Sung VW, Siddiqui NY, Zyczynski HM, Ridgeway B, Rogers RG, Arya LA, Mazloomdoost D, Levy J, Carper B, Gantz MG, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Pelvic Floor Disorders Network.
    Am J Obstet Gynecol, 2020 Feb, 222(2): 154.e1-154.e10
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2019.08.011 | PMID: 31421123 | PMCID: PMC6995424
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 13.2
  29. Leisure activities and disability in activities of daily living among the oldest-old Chinese population: evidence from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Study.
    Li ZH, Chen Q, Byers Kraus V, Shen D, Zhang XR, Zhang PD, Zhong WF, Lv YB, Huang QM, Song WQ, Wang D, Wu XB, Shi XM, Mao C
    Aging (Albany NY), 2020 Jun 12, 12(11): 10687-10703
    https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.103287 | PMID: 32532929 | PMCID: PMC7346052
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  30. Associations of regular glucosamine use with all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a large prospective cohort study.
    Li ZH, Gao X, Chung VC, Zhong WF, Fu Q, Lv YB, Wang ZH, Shen D, Zhang XR, Zhang PD, Li FR, Huang QM, Chen Q, Song WQ, Wu XB, Shi XM, Kraus VB, Yang X, Mao C
    Ann Rheum Dis, 2020 Jun, 79(6): 829-836
    https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2020-217176 | PMID: 32253185 | PMCID: PMC7286049
    Citations: | AltScore: 79.104
  31. Associations of habitual fish oil supplementation with cardiovascular outcomes and all cause mortality: evidence from a large population based cohort study.
    Li ZH, Zhong WF, Liu S, Kraus VB, Zhang YJ, Gao X, Lv YB, Shen D, Zhang XR, Zhang PD, Huang QM, Chen Q, Wu XB, Shi XM, Wang D, Mao C
    BMJ, 2020 Mar 4, 368: m456
    https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m456 | PMID: 32131999 | PMCID: PMC7249244
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 346.55
  32. Higher dietary diversity scores and protein-rich food consumption were associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality in the oldest old.
    Lv Y, Kraus VB, Gao X, Yin Z, Zhou J, Mao C, Duan J, Zeng Y, Brasher MS, Shi W, Shi X
    Clin Nutr, 2020 Jul, 39(7): 2246-2254
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2019.10.012 | PMID: 31685303 | PMCID: PMC7182467
    Citations: | AltScore: 9.45
  33. Long-term exposure to PM<sub>2.5</sub> and incidence of disability in activities of daily living among oldest old.
    Lv Y, Zhou J, Kraus VB, Li T, Sarnat JA, Wang J, Liu Y, Chen H, Brasher MS, Mao C, Zeng Y, Zheng T, Shi X
    Environ Pollut, 2020 Apr, 259: 113910
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2020.113910 | PMID: 32023791 | PMCID: PMC7261238
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: NA
  34. Specific Leisure Activities and Cognitive Functions Among the Oldest-Old: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey.
    Mao C, Li ZH, Lv YB, Gao X, Kraus VB, Zhou JH, Wu XB, Shi WY, Li FR, Liu SM, Yin ZX, Zeng Y, Shi XM
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Mar 9, 75(4): 739-746
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz086 | PMID: 30946444 | PMCID: PMC6776703
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 1
  35. Pre-transplant hepatic steatosis (fatty liver) is associated with chronic graft-vs-host disease but not mortality.
    Maung K, Ramalingam S, Chaudhry M, Ren Y, Jung SH, Romero K, Corbet K, Chao NJ, Choi T, Diehl AM, Diehl L, Gasparetto C, Horwitz M, Long GD, Lopez RD, Rizzieri DA, Sarantopoulos S, Sullivan KM, Bashir MR, Sung AD
    PLoS One, 2020, 15(9): e0238824
    https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0238824 | PMID: 32915853 | PMCID: PMC7485815
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  36. Novel approaches to metabolic assessment and structured exercise to promote recovery in ICU survivors.
    Molinger J, Pastva AM, Whittle J, Wischmeyer PE
    Curr Opin Crit Care, 2020 Aug, 26(4): 369-378
    https://doi.org/10.1097/MCC.0000000000000748 | PMID: 32568800
    Citations: | AltScore: 81.4
  37. A protocol to reduce self-reported pain scores and adverse events following lumbar punctures in older adults.
    Nobuhara CK, Bullock WM, Bunning T, Colin B, Cooter M, Devinney MJ, Ferrandino MN, Gadsden J, Garrigues G, Habib AS, Moretti E, Moul J, Ohlendorf B, Sandler A, Scheri R, Sharma B, Thomas JP, Young C, Mathew JP, Berger M, MADCO-PC and INTUIT Investigators Teams.
    J Neurol, 2020 Mar 20, 267(7): 2002-2006
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-09797-1 | PMID: 32198714 | PMCID: PMC7336280
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2
  38. Geriatric assessment for older adults with sickle cell disease: protocol for a prospective cohort pilot study.
    Oyedeji CI, Hall K, Luciano A, Morey MC, Strouse JJ
    Pilot Feasibility Stud, 2020, 6: 131
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-020-00673-3 | PMID: 32974042 | PMCID: PMC7495855
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  39. Cognition, Physical Function, and Quality of Life in Older Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.
    Pastva AM, Hugenschmidt CE, Kitzman DW, Nelson MB, Brenes GA, Reeves GR, Mentz RJ, Whellan DJ, Chen H, Duncan PW
    J Card Fail, 2020 Sep 18
    pii: S1071-9164(20)30954-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2020.09.007 | PMID: 32956816
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  40. Microbiota as Predictor of Mortality in Allogeneic Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.
    Peled JU, Gomes ALC, Devlin SM, Littmann ER, Taur Y, Sung AD, Weber D, Hashimoto D, Slingerland AE, Slingerland JB, Maloy M, Clurman AG, Stein-Thoeringer CK, Markey KA, Docampo MD, Burgos da Silva M, Khan N, Gessner A, Messina JA, Romero K, Lew MV, Bush A, Bohannon L, Brereton DG, Fontana E, Amoretti LA, Wright RJ, Armijo GK, Shono Y, Sanchez-Escamilla M, Castillo Flores N, Alarcon Tomas A, Lin RJ, Y??ez San Segundo L, Shah GL, Cho C, Scordo M, Politikos I, Hayasaka K, Hasegawa Y, Gyurkocza B, Ponce DM, Barker JN, Perales MA, Giralt SA, Jenq RR, Teshima T, Chao NJ, Holler E, Xavier JB, Pamer EG, van den Brink MRM
    N Engl J Med, 2020 Feb 27, 382(9): 822-834
    https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1900623 | PMID: 32101664 | PMCID: PMC7534690
    Citations: 6 | AltScore: 364.68
  41. Impact of exercise on the immune system and outcomes in hematologic malignancies.
    Sitlinger A, Brander DM, Bartlett DB
    Blood Adv, 2020 Apr 28, 4(8): 1801-1811
    https://doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019001317 | PMID: 32343800 | PMCID: PMC7189285
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.25
  42. Microtransplantation in older patients with AML: A pilot study of safety, efficacy and immunologic effects.
    Sung AD, Jauhari S, Siamakpour-Reihani S, Rao AV, Staats J, Chan C, Meyer E, Gadi VK, Nixon AB, Lyu J, Xie J, Bohannon L, Li Z, Hourigan CS, Dillon LW, Wong HY, Shelby R, Diehl L, de Castro C, LeBlanc T, Brander D, Erba H, Galal A, Stefanovic A, Chao N, Rizzieri DA
    Am J Hematol, 2020 Jun, 95(6): 662-671
    https://doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25781 | PMID: 32162718 | PMCID: PMC7433709
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 1
  43. House calls for stem cell transplant patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Sung AD, Nichols KR, Chao NJ
    Blood, 2020 Jul 16, 136(3): 370-371
    https://doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020006573 | PMID: 32488235 | PMCID: PMC7365917
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.25
  44. A New Severity Scoring Scale for the 3-Minute Confusion Assessment Method (3D-CAM).
    Vasunilashorn SM, Devinney MJ, Acker L, Jung Y, Ngo L, Cooter M, Huang R, Marcantonio ER, Berger M
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Jun 1, 68(8): 1874-1876
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16538 | PMID: 32479640 | PMCID: PMC7429287
    Citations: | AltScore: 10.5
  45. Teleassessment of Gait and Gait Aids: Validity and Interrater Reliability.
    Venkataraman K, Amis K, Landerman LR, Caves K, Koh GC, Hoenig H
    Phys Ther, 2020 Apr 17, 100(4): 708-717
    https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzaa005 | PMID: 31984420 | PMCID: PMC7439231
    Citations: | AltScore: 1
  46. Fine Particulate Matter and Poor Cognitive Function among Chinese Older Adults: Evidence from a Community-Based, 12-Year Prospective Cohort Study.
    Wang J, Li T, Lv Y, Kraus VB, Zhang Y, Mao C, Yin Z, Shi W, Zhou J, Zheng T, Kinney PL, Ji J, Tang S, Shi X
    Environ Health Perspect, 2020 Jun, 128(6): 67013
    https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP5304 | PMID: 32551881 | PMCID: PMC7302441
    Citations: | AltScore: 17.4
  47. Neurovascular and immune mechanisms that regulate postoperative delirium superimposed on dementia.
    Wang P, Velagapudi R, Kong C, Rodriguiz RM, Wetsel WC, Yang T, Berger M, Gelbard HA, Colton CA, Terrando N
    Alzheimers Dement, 2020 May, 16(5): 734-749
    https://doi.org/10.1002/alz.12064 | PMID: 32291962 | PMCID: PMC7317948
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 43.6
  48. Cognitive Impairment among Veterans in Outpatient Vision Rehabilitation.
    Whitson HE, Woolson S, Olsen M, Massof R, Ferguson SM, Muir KW, Dziadul JA Jr, McConnell E, Stelmack JA
    Optom Vis Sci, 2020 Jun, 97(6): 462-469
    https://doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0000000000001522 | PMID: 32511169 | PMCID: PMC7291825
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  49. Long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter and fasting blood glucose level in a Chinese elderly cohort.
    Zhang Y, Li T, Ma R, Yin Z, Wang J, He MZ, Xu D, Gao X, Wang Q, Kraus VB, Lv Y, Zhong Y, Kinney PL, Shi X
    Sci Total Environ, 2020 May 15, 717: 137191
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137191 | PMID: 32062280 | PMCID: PMC7183512
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  50. Development and Validation of a Nomogram for Predicting the 6-Year Risk of Cognitive Impairment Among Chinese Older Adults.
    Zhou J, Lv Y, Mao C, Duan J, Gao X, Wang J, Yin Z, Shi W, Luo J, Kang Q, Zhang X, Wei Y, Kraus VB, Shi X
    J Am Med Dir Assoc, 2020 Jun, 21(6): 864-871.e6
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2020.03.032 | PMID: 32507532 | PMCID: PMC7299771
    Citations: | AltScore: 7
  51. Relationship between neural functional connectivity and memory performance in age-related macular degeneration.
    Zuo X, Zhuang J, Chen NK, Cousins S, Cunha P, Lad EM, Madden DJ, Potter G, Whitson HE
    Neurobiol Aging, 2020 Nov, 95: 176-185
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.07.020 | PMID: 32829250 | PMCID: PMC7609595
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.25


EXTERNAL ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS

Karen Bandeen Roche
John Hopkins University
Serving since 2010 (11 years)

George Kuchel MD
University of Connecticut, Geriatrics and Gerontology
Serving since 2016 (5 years)

Neil Alexander, MD
University of Michigan
Serving since 2016 (5 years)


RECOGNITION AND AWARDS (2020-2021)
Amy M. Pastva, PT, MA, PhD, CHSE (2020)
  • Best Research Platform Presentation from the American Physical Therapy Association’s Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section at the 2020 Combined Sections Conference.
Anna Mae Diehl, MD (2020)
  • American Gastroenterology Association: AGA Institute Council Research Mentor Award for Liver /Biliary
  • Scientific Advisory Council for the National Institute for Alcohol Addiction and Abuse (NIAAA) effective July 2020
David Bartlett, PHD (2020)
  • American Society for Hematology Junior Clinical Faculty Scholarship ($150,000).
Juliessa Pavon, MD (2020)
  • Duke University, LEADERS, Leadership Development Scholar Epic National Geriatrics Steering Board, Selected Member
  • Tideswell AGS-ADGAP UCSF Emerging Leaders in Aging Scholar Clark E, Jolly Graham A, Bellantoni J, White H, Pavon J. Uncovering errors in transitions from hospital to nursing home: A video telehealth transitions conference. Selected as North Carolina American College of Physicians best Quality Improvement Project, and invitation to present at National ACP Annual Meeting.
  • Association of American Medical College (AAMC) – Early Career Women Faculty Leadership Development Scholar
  • US Deprescribing Network Junior Investigator Intensive Scholars Program
  • Society of Hospital Medicine, Research Committee, Selected Member Junior Investigator Award, Subcommittee Innovations, Subcommittee
Kenneth E. Schmader, MD (2020)
  • Duke School of Medicine Career Mentoring Award in Clinical – Population Health Science
  • Appointed to COVID-19 Vaccine Work Group, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Centers for Disease Control
Miriam C. Morey, Ph.D. (2020)
  • VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Paul B Magnuson Award
Rasheeda Hall, MD, MHS, MBA (2020)
  • American Society for Clinical Investigation Young Physician-Scientist Award American Geriatrics Society Best Paper Award for the Clin-Star Paper Session
  • American Geriatrics Society Arti Hurria Memorial Award
  • American Geriatrics Society Best Paper Award for the Clin-Star Paper Session

MINORITY RESEARCH

General Brief Description of Minority Activities:

Determinants of maintenance and recovery of function in a representative older community-resident biracial sample

Gerda Fillenbaum, PhD, co-investigator, Katherine Hall, PhD, Carl Pieper, DPh, Heather Whitson, MD, MHS, Cathleen Colón-Emeric, MD, MHS, Core leaders

Focus on decline in performance of activities of daily living (ADL) has not been matched by studies of recovery of function. Advised by a broad conceptual model of physical resilience, we ascertain characteristics that identify (1) maintenance, (2) decline, and (3) recovery of personal self-maintenance activities over six years in an older (age 65-105 years), community representative sample (n = 3187; African American: 54%, White: 45%). All were participants in the Duke Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly, and were unimpaired at baseline.

Over six years, ~75% remained unimpaired, of whom 30% were unimpaired when they dropped out or died. Of ~25% who became impaired, just over half recovered. Analyses, which took into account demographic characteristics, health conditions, health service use, social services provided and received, neighborhood safety, and survival status, indicated that those who became impaired were in poorer health, were younger, and more likely to be African American. Characteristics of recovery included younger age, not hospitalized in the previous year, and increased social support.

Our analyses indicate that maintenance of health status facilitated continued unimpaired basic activities of daily living. While decline was associated with poorer health, younger age, and being African American, recovery was also associated with younger age, and in addition social support, and no further deterioration in health as measured here.

Following decline in functioning, increased effort is needed to improve health and avoid further decline, and effort that takes into account not only physical but also personal social conditions.

 

Fillenbaum GG, Sloane R, Burchett BM, Hall K, Pieper CF, Whitson HE, Colón-Emeric CS.  Determinants of maintenance and recovery of function in a representative older community- resident biracial sample. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2020 Feb 6:S1525-8610(19)30891-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2019.12.021. Online ahead of print. PMID: 32037299 NIHMS 1569426   https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2019.12.021




Minority Trainee(s):
  • Candace Brown, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Trainee - Aging Center
    Dr. Candace Brown completed a post-doctoral training program at the Duke Aging Center in 2019 and participated in numerous training opportunities with the Duke OAIC. Her primary research focus was in the area of motivation and long-term adherence to exercise. Her primary mentor, Dr. Miriam Morey, supported research at the Durham VA and with the Duke OAIC. Two papers are in review for this work. In addition, she published a manuscript derived from the Duke OAIC sponsored Physical Performance Across the Life Span (PALS) study. Noppert, G., Brown, C.S., Chanti-Ketterl, M., Hall, K., Newby, K.L., Cohen, H.J. & Morey, M.C. (2018). The Impact of multiple dimensions of socioeconomic status on physical functioning across the life course. Journals of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, 4, 1-8. doi.org/10.1177%2F2333721418794021. Following completion of her fellowship, she accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of Gerontology Gerontology in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte.
  • Charity Oyedeji, MD, PESC Scholar,
    Dr. Charity Oyedeji's research focuses on implementing a geriatric assessment into clinical assessments of older adults with sickle cell disease. Due to advances in care and access, patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are living longer than they have in previous generations. SCD is recognized as a condition that mimics accelerated aging, but little is known about aging with SCD. In particular, SCD patients face frequent health stressors including hypoxia, pain crises, and frequent hospitalizations, but little is known about how aging with SCD affects one’s resilience to these stressors. The objective of this study is to test the feasibility and safety of focused geriatric assessment and provocative tests that measure physiological reserve in SCD patients over age 50 and to determine the feasibility of a protocol to assess resilience to the stressor of hospitalization in older SCD patients. In addition, biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, and longevity will be compared in 20 older (age 50-70) people with SCD and 20 younger (age 18-49) people with SCD. Thus far, the study has demonstrated that focused geriatric assessment, including provocative performance measures was safe and well-tolerated by older SCD patients. 50% of the older participants experienced a hospitalization within 12 months of a baseline assessment, indicating the feasibility of a future study to prospectively measure resilience after hospitalization by following a cohort of well-characterized participants for 2 years. Measures of physiological reserve in older SCD patients, on average, were consistent with normative measures from healthy seniors 20-30 years older. Thus far, Dr. Oyedeji has used these findings to support a successful application for funding from the American Society of Hematology. She was also the recipient of 3 outstanding abstract awards at national meetings, and the recipient of the 2019 Duke Maddox Award for Aging Research.
  • Rasheeda Hall, MD, MHS, MBA, Assistant Professor of Medicine
    Pepper REC Scholar 2016-2018 (Duke Minority Supplement Awardee 2012-2014) Beeson Scholar still mentored by OAIC Rasheeda K. Hall, MD, MHS, MBA Dr. Rasheeda Hall is an Assistant Professor in Nephrology with an interest in exploring solutions to health system problems for vulnerable populations, such as low-income, elderly, and uninsured patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that rely on Medicare and Medicaid for healthcare coverage. She completed a diversity supplement to develop a deep understanding of the health system problems that impact the vulnerable population of nursing home (NH) residents with CKD. Dr. Hall's primary research interest is in resilience in older dialysis patients. Funding Since Pepper Support Dr. Hall received funding from the HCSRN-OAICs AGING Initiative for a study “Development of a CKD Discordance Index to Identify High Healthcare Utilization”. Researchers: Kristi Reynolds, PhD (KPSC); Barrett Bowling, MD, MPSH (Duke); Rasheeda Hall, MD (Duke). She also received a NIH Loan Repayment award and a Doris Duke “Fund to Retain Clinical Researcher” award. She received Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging K76 award and the American Society of Nephrology Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program award.

Minority Grant(s):