UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

Principal Investigator    Jay Magaziner, Ph.D.  410-706-3553  jmagazin@som.umaryland.edu
Program Administrator    Anne Sullens, M.A  410-706-1695  asullens@som.umaryland.edu
       
CENTER DESCRIPTION

The mission of the UM-OAIC is to address the process by which function is lost, and the multiple factors that affect the onset and progression of disability. Building on these important perspectives, the UMOAIC focuses on the restoration of function (i.e., enablement) in order to improve function in those with impairments, and prevent or delay further progression in those who are already disabled. This is accomplished by 1) conducting research that examines the mechanisms underlying the functional impairments associated with stroke, hip fracture, and prevalent chronic diseases in older people; 2) designing novel, efficacious exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions that produce clinically relevant outcomes and study the mechanisms underlying them; 3) translating the most efficacious interventions developed in UM-OAIC clinical laboratories and in other clinical centers for implementation and rigorous evaluation outside the clinic (e.g., home, senior center, gym); 4) supporting pilot and exploratory studies (PESs), UM-OAIC junior scholar research, development projects (DPs), and externally funded projects (EP) that examine the mechanisms underlying disability and the process of recovery, and that design and test interventions for the restoration and maintenance of function in clinical laboratories and settings outside the medical center; and 5) fostering the career development of junior faculty/scholars from multiple disciplines into independent, academic scientists with expertise in the study of older persons with disabling diseases through mentor-based, bench-to-bedside translational research training that includes didactic and experiential/practical-applied training in conducting independent, aging research.

The UM-OAIC has three resource cores (RC): Biostatistics, Informatics and Translational Science (RC1); Applied Physiology and Tissue Mechanisms (RC-2); and Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation (RC-3), that serve as a resources for the conduct of innovative exercise and activity-based rehabilitation research. An enhanced Research Education Core (REC) (formerly RCDC) will provide didactic and experiential training under the guidance of an interdisciplinary mentoring team to prepare the next generation of scientists committed to careers in aging research. Center aims will be accomplished by: 1) using multidisciplinary research working groups (RWGs) to provide mentoring and guide REC and PES investigators and faculty scholars in designing and conducting their projects, reporting results, and developing future investigations; 2) supporting studies that determine the mechanisms underlying functional impairments and implement exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions to improve clinically relevant outcomes; and 3) translate safe and efficacious interventions into randomized clinical trials outside the medical center with the goal of changing practice for those with disabling diseases and conditions. The restoration of functional independence through an integrated approach that includes exercise and activity-based rehabilitation will transform the care of older people with disabling diseases and conditions.


CORES
Leadership and Administrative Core (LAC)
Leader 1:    Jay Magaziner, PhD, MS Hyg.   jmagazin@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Leslie I. Katzel, MD   lkatzel@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 3:    Alice Ryan, PhD   aryan@som.umaryland.edu
The LAC will foster ongoing discussion among core leaders and faculty scholars to ensure that research and research training are carried out in a cohesive, coordinated and integrated manner. The LAC will also engage scientists and educators from across the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) community so that research and research training can take full advantage of the breadth and depth of experience in aging and other relevant areas to facilitate collaborations that advance UM-OAIC goals. The LAC will receive input and guidance and discuss program operations in the Core Leadership Executive Committee (CLEC) of resource core (RC) leaders; the UM-OAIC Research and Education Advisory Committee (REAC) charged with reviewing proposed Development and Pilot/Exploratory Studies; an Internal Advisory Committee (IAC) charged with evaluating UM-OAIC progress and accomplishments and advising on ways to extend research on aging to other university centers and departments; and an External Advisory Board (EAB) that will provide guidance to the program and report progress annually to the NIA. In addition, the LAC will support an Internal Data and Safety Monitoring Board (I-DSMB) that will review the conduct of clinical protocols to ensure patient safety, and an External Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) that will provide another layer of review by experienced scientists who can remain impartial as they monitor data quality and safety, and report to the NIA annually.

Research Education Component (REC)
Leader 1:    Jack Guralnik, MD, PhD, MPH   jguralnik@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Mary-Claire Roghmann, MD, MS   mroghman@som.umaryland.edu
The purpose of the Research Education Core (REC) is to foster the career development of junior faculty from multiple disciplines into academic scientists in gerontology and geriatrics, focusing on the theme of exercise and activity rehabilitation and recovery research. The REC supports mentor-based research training and education to promote the career development of REC Scholars as well as other junior faculty, fellows, and students pursuing research careers in aging. The UM-OAIC has a successful history of mentored training that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries to develop novel research for improving function and independence in older persons. This has enriched the cadre of scientists at UM and elsewhere conducting aging research in exercise and rehabilitation science.

Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core (PESC)
Leader 1:    Stephen Seliger, MD, MS   sseliger@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Marc Hochberg, MD, MPH, MACP, MACR   mhochber@som.umaryland.edu
The purpose of the UM-OAIC Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core (PESC) is to provide critical, initial funding for pilot and exploratory studies that are consistent with the Center’s overall goal, which is to build on the sciences and therapeutic applications of exercise and rehabilitation by: 1) advancing our understanding of the mechanisms by which exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions directed at specific impairments affect multiple body systems underlying functional performance; and 2) developing and testing interventions to restore function and minimize disability following acute disabling events and gradual declines related to serious chronic diseases. To meet this objective, the PESC will provide research support and mentoring of investigators with high quality pilot and exploratory research proposals designed to acquire preliminary data needed for future crucial studies congruent with the Center’s focus: examination of the mechanisms underlying mobility limitation, physical disability, and recovery from disability in vulnerable older adults, and assessment of functional and clinical responses to novel exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions.

Applied Physiology and Tissue Mechanisms
Leader 1:    Alice Ryan, PhD   aryan@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Leslie I. Katzel, MD   lkatzel@som.umaryland.edu

Cardiovascular deconditioning, chronic inflammation, and endocrine-metabolic dysfunction are inherent to the pathophysiology of the physical impairments in older persons hindered by disabling chronic diseases of aging. Sarcopenia, poor fitness, inflammation, and acute events causing disability such as falls, stroke, and hip fracture occur with advancing age, which may worsen mobility and increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic abnormalities. RC-2’s hypothesis is that exercise and activity-based rehabilitation can improve multiple physiological systems in older, mobility-limited individuals leading to improved functional performance, reduced cardiometabolic disease risk, and prevention of functional decline.  By determining the composition, molecular, and metabolic abnormalities in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and vascular endothelium, and response to exercise rehabilitation, we can optimize exercise interventions to improve muscle structure, function, metabolism, and CVD risk profiles in older adults with these chronic conditions. Exercise interventions may potentially reduce risk and delay chronic disability in older adults.  To achieve this goal, RC2 implements specific aims that:




Biostatistical Design and Analysis Core (BDAC)
Leader 1:    John D. Sorkin, MD, PhD   jsorkin@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Michael Terrin, MD, MPH   mterrin@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 3:    Laurence Magder, PhD   lmagder@som.umaryland.edu

The goal of the Biostatistics, Informatics, and Translational Resource Core (RC-1), is to provide biostatistical and informatics support to investigators, to help design interventions that prevent functional decline, promote restoration and maintenance of function, and to facilitate the translation of interventions from laboratory to clinic and community. We will participate in Research Working Groups (RWGs), a forum in which investigators from multiple disciplines collaborate on the design and conduct of studies. Our informatics system (GERI) will provide an infrastructure that helps us manage studies and facilitates the flow of information and data. RC-1 draws on the resources and statistical expertise of the UM Department of Epidemiology and Public Health’s Divisions of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, and Gerontology. We share resources and personnel with the biostatistics cores of the Baltimore VA Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), the VA RR&D Maryland Exercise and Robotics Center of Excellence (MERCE), and the UM Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC). The resultant synergy saves money and makes the whole more than the sum of its parts. Statistical methods, hardware purchased and software developed by one center are used by all center.




Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation
Leader 1:    Richard Macko, MD   rmacko@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Li-Qun (Larry) Zhang, PhD   l-zhang@som.umaryland.edu

The combination of physical impairments and a sedentary lifestyle with aging and chronic conditions such as stroke, hip fracture, metabolic syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, results in multi-system brain, neuromotor, physiological, behavioral, and cognitive deficits that precipitate loss of functional independence and disability.  The central hypothesis of Resource Core-3 (RC-3) Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation is that appropriately selected functional activity and exercise-based rehabilitation interventions can promote beneficial changes in brain [central nervous system (CNS) structure, connectivity, and physiology] and neuromotor mechanisms to improve motor performance and function and minimize chronic disability in older people. 

 

RC-3 provides support, guidance, and mentoring to UM-OAIC investigators using a multi-system approach focused on whole-body balance, locomotion, and upper limb activities to address the mechanistic bases upon which to build novel rehabilitation strategies to improve motor function and independence and promote recovery in older people with chronic disease-associated disabilities.  Through this framework, functional activity and exercise-mediated brain and neuromotor plasticity can be identified to guide condition-specific and individual-specific rehabilitation approaches for minimizing disability. The complementary and collaborative relationship between RC-3 and RC-2 -- which focuses on muscle, metabolic, and cardiovascular mechanisms of aging with disability -- forges a strong and comprehensive inter-core synergy for understanding the bases for designing and testing effective new rehabilitation programs to restore and sustain functional independence and quality of living among older individuals.




CAREER DEVELOPMENT
REC Scholar, Research & Grants Funded During Pepper Supported Time Years Publications
 
Tasneem Khambaty, PhD
Assistant Professor / Department of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Depressive Symptoms, Executive Function, and Trajectories of Diabetes Biomarkers: Relations to Functional Status and Race-Related Disparities in the HANDLS study
  • UM-OAIC Pilot Award: Relations of Glucose Variability with Cognitive Function and Functional Status among Older Adults at Risk for Diabetes
  • NIH/NIA Extramural Loan Repayment Program: Depressive Symptoms, Executive Function, and Trajectories of Diabetes Biomarkers: Relations to Functional Status and Race-Related Disparities in the HANDLS study

2018-2021  24 (7 1st/Sr)
Sarasi Desikan, MD
Assistant Professor / Department of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis: Cognitive and Mobility Function after Exercise (ACCOF-Ex)
The purpose of her study is to determine the effect of a challenging aerobic and balance exercise intervention on cognitive and mobility function in patients with moderate (50-69%) asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. In addition, the study evaluates functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a novel modality to assess cerebral oxygenation during cognitive and mobility tasks.
  • Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis: Cognitive Function and Plaque Correlates- Exercise Intervention. University of Maryland Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Voucher Support Grant, Desikan (PI). 1/2020-1/2021. $5,000

2019-2022  9 (2 1st/Sr)

Past Scholars
F. Rainer von Coelln, Dr. med, Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine (2017-2020)

PILOT/EXPLORATORY PROJECTS (7 Pilot Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: Relations of Glucose Variability with Cognitive Function and Functional Status among Older Adults at Risk for Diabetes
  Leader: Tasneem Khambaty, PhD
 

Abstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is an independent risk factor for dementia and less severe forms of cognitive dysfunction and may compromise functional status. Metrics derived from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology – i.e., glucose variability – may facilitate the detection of impaired glycemia much earlier than the conventional glycemic metrics. We propose a robust characterization of intra- and inter-day variability in glucose regulation and a deeper understanding of the extent to which this variability influences cognitive aging and functional decline in persons at risk for diabetes. Understanding this early aging trajectory is an important step towards discerning the mechanisms underlying various aspects of glycemia and neurocognition.

Hypotheses: Our central hypothesis is that even before diabetes onset, glucose variability will be associated with worse cognitive function and lower functional status among older adults. Our specific aims are to examine the association of glucose variability derived from CGMS over a 10-day self-monitoring period with cognitive function, and functional status among individuals with prediabetes, aged 50 or older.

 
2. Project Title: Immune mechanisms responsible for the impaired B cell responses to new antigens in the elderly
  Leader: Franklin Toapanta, PhD
  Abstract: Development of humoral responses to new antigens are impaired in older adults (>65 years). Alterations at multiple levels of the immune system are likely implicated and, to date, there is little information about the intrinsic B cell factors responsible for the poor antibody responses in older adults. We have used Hepatitis B virus vaccination as a model to study potential alterations on B cell responses. We hypothesized that older adults, compared to young adults, have a reduced pool of circulating antigen-specific B cells to novel antigens. Furthermore, we hypothesized that in older adults, antigen-specific B memory cells induced by vaccination will have reduced antibody production capacity due to higher activation thresholds. These studies were proposed to be carried out in cryopreserved specimens (PBMC) of volunteers vaccinated with Recombivax-HB (HBV vaccine).
 
3. Project Title: Home Exercise (HEX) for Homebound Older Adults
  Leader: Alyssa Stookey, PhD
 

Abstract:Little is known about the feasibility and utility of pragmatic home-based exercise in older homebound adults with severe mobility disability. We propose a feasibility study to design and implement a pragmatic 12-week home exercise program (HEX) intervention program to improve physical functioning and quality of life in homebound older adults with mobility disability.

Hypothesis: Our general hypothesis is HEX will prove feasible and effective in maintaining and restoring physical functioning and perceived quality of life. Aim #1: We will work with providers and patients to develop a feasible and pragmatic, multi-component home exercise program targeting mobility, strength, and performance of task-oriented ADLs. Aim #2: Perform a small study to better assess feasibility and determine the effect(s) of the home-based intervention created in Aim 1 on functional outcomes and QOL(at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks) in older, homebound adults.

 
4. Project Title: Mobile Sensor Investigation of Gait Variability and Hip abductors
  Leader: Odessa Addison, DPT, PhD
 

Abstract: Our work suggests that dysfunction of the hip abductors may contribute to balance and mobility limitations resulting in increased fall risk. We have previously shown that gait variability, defined as fluctuations between gait cycles, are an important assessment of mobility and balance function and related to muscle composition of the hip abductor muscles. Gait variability is traditionally assessed via a short 25-foot walk way. However, this distance is too short to account for the impact of fatigue. We propose examining changes in gait variability over a six-minute walk distance may allow for an earlier detection of fall risk by exposing impairments that occur under conditions of fatigue that would otherwise go undetected. The overall aim of our work is to study the use of technology-based assessments and interventions which impact enablement of older adults.

Hypothesis/Aims: Aim 1: Examine changes in gait variability between the early and late phase of the six-minute walk.  Aim 2: Compare how gait variability in the early and late phases of the six-minute walk relates to muscle size and composition of the hip abductors.  Aim 3: Examine how changes in the hip abductors after a 12-week intervention relates to changes in gait variability during the early and late phases of the six-minute walk.  

 
5. Project Title: Neural mechanisms of reduction in stroke-induced-hemiparesis by robot-assisted-training
  Leader: Michael Dimyan, MD
 

Abstract: Arm weakness persists chronically in 40% of stroke survivors and accounts for at least half of the decline in quality of life after stroke. Our preliminary work indicates that robot-assisted-training can provide clinically meaningful improvements in arm function for approximately 30% of patients with chronic post-stroke-hemiparesis. The goals of this proposal are: 1) to investigate brain network activity changes that occur during robot-assisted-training and 2) to determine the baseline residual brain network connectivity required for patients to respond to robot-assisted-training, The results of this study will lead to establishment of a personalized medicine algorithm for robot-assisted-training to the patients most likely to respond to it, shifting the delivery of therapy for chronic stroke-induced arm weakness towards individualized, evidence-based care. 

Hypothesis/Aims: Specific Aim 1) Define cortical connectivity dynamics during robot-assisted-training. Hypothesis: Robot- assisted- training induced increases in cortical connectivity between bilateral primary motor areas and angular gyrus and parietal operculum will positively correlate with improvement in robot-assisted-assessments . Approach: Near infrared spectroscopy brain imaging will be used to measure cortical activity in motor and non-motor cortical areas real-time during 9 sessions of robot-assisted-training over 3 weeks in a cohort of 10 patients with chronic post-stroke-hemiparesis. The relationships between cortical connectivity and measures of movement and proprioception will be analyzed.

Specific Aim 2) Identify baseline brain network connectivity predictors of robot-assisted-training impairment reductions. Hypothesis (a): Baseline connectivity of angular gyrus and parietal operculum to sensorimotor networks will predict reductions in impairment induced by robot-assisted-training. Approach: We have brain MRI baseline network functional connectivity data on 66 patients with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis who have undergone 3 months (~36 sessions) of robot-assisted-training of the upper extremity. This aim will analyze baseline brain functional connectivity prior to the onset of training to find correlates of training induced impairment reduction. 

 
6. Project Title: Ryanodine Receptors as Novel Targets in Chronotropic Incompetence in the Aging Heart
  Leader: B. Maura Greiser, PhD
 

Abstract: Chronotropic incompetence is the hallmark of the aging heart. This means that the heart’s pacemaker, the sino-atrial node (SAN), fails to produce a heart rate that is fast enough to match circulatory demand. This results in reduced left ventricular output over time in the aging heart compared to younger hearts.

Hypothesis/Aims: The goal of this Pilot Project is to provide foundational evidence linking RyR2 dysfunction to chronotropic incompetence. We further want to test whether aging-mediated RyR2 dysfunction in SAN cells can be partially reversed by a) pharmaceutical agents that stabilize RyR2 function and b) by reducing the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS).

 
7. Project Title: Age-dependent changes in nuclear mechanotransduction as a driver of sarcopenia
  Leader: Richard Lovering, PhD, PT
 

Abstract: Nuclear position and mechanotransduction depend not only microtubule (MT) structure, but also on coupling between MTs and the LINC (linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex, which connects cytoplasmic structures to the nuclear interior, transmitting stress directly to DNA and the nuclear lamins. Bidirectional exchange of proteins and mRNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm is mediated by the nuclear pore complex, a small multi-protein channel.

Hypothesis/Aims: We are testing the hypothesis that nuclear mechanotransduction is disrupted in aging fibers, underscoring the transcriptional deficiency in aging that drives sarcopenia. Aims are unchanged and are: 1 (mouse) to determine the impact of the cytoskeleton and LINC complex on nuclear dynamics (movement, position, shape & deformability) and nuclear mechanotransduction in aging muscle, and 2 (human) to determine the profile of microtubules, LINC, and the nuclear pore complex in aged human muscles.

 
DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (0 Development Projects Listed)
  No development projects.
RESEARCH (26 Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: PREVENTING DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS THROUGH MANIPULATING THE SKIN MICROBIOTA
  Leader(s): ROGHMANN, MARY-CLAIRE
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001601 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  Diabetes is common in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient population with a prevalence of24% making it a priority clinical issue for Veterans. Between 10 and 25% of people with diabetes will develop afoot ulcer during their lifetime. Diabetic foot ulcers are a leading cause of hospitalization, as well as the primarycause of lower limb amputations. About 5% of patients with a foot ulce...
 
2. Project Title: ASYMPTOMATIC CAROTID STENOSIS: COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND PLAQUE CORRELATES - 2
  Leader(s): LAL, BRAJESH K
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001621 / (2017-2021)
  Core(s):
  Vascular cognitive impairment is an insidious disease resulting from accumulated ischemic injury to thebrain. Our VA Merit-funded Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis and Cognitive Function (ACCOF) found that in thesetting of carotid stenosis, alterations of behavior can occur in the absence of physical manifestations ofstroke. Otherwise asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis had worse cognitive per...
 
3. Project Title: CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING IN INSULIN TREATED HOSPITALIZED VETERANS WITH DM2 AT HIGHER RISK FOR HYPOGLYCEMIA
  Leader(s): SPANAKIS, ILIAS
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001825 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  More than 25% of patients admitted to general wards/non Intensive Care Unit (non-ICU) setting have a historyof Diabetes Mellitus (DM); and as for 2012, $125 billion dollars were costs associated with hospitalization ofdiabetics in the United States (US). Up to 30% of the hospitalized diabetics develop hypoglycemia, a conditionthat is associated with higher hospital charges, prolonged length of sta...
 
4. Project Title: PROMOTION OF SUCCESSFUL WEIGHT MANAGEMENT IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE VETERANS
  Leader(s): RYAN, ALICE S.; ORTMEYER, HEIDI K ; SERRA, MONICA C ;
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001965 / (2020-2025)
  Core(s):
  Over 70% of Veterans who receive health care at the VA are overweight or obese, and obesity rates of Veterans receiving care at the VA are higher compared to non-Veterans and Veterans who do not use the VA. Obesity contributes to loss of mobility which is a significant determinant of morbidity and loss of independence. Obesity also is associated with elevated cardiometabolic risk factors, includin...
 
5. Project Title: ROLE OF A NOVEL EXERCISE PROGRAM TO PREVENT POST-THROMBOTIC SYNDROME
  Leader(s): LAL, BRAJESH K
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX000995 / (2014-2021)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Despite standard care, 25%-50% of patients with acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) progress to chronic post- thrombotic syndrome (PTS) resulting in significant disability, loss of productivity, and healthcare costs. This is a problem encountered frequently among our numerous Veterans undergoing surgery, anesthesia, traumatic and acute injury, and surgical c...
 
6. Project Title: EFFECTS OF 12-WEEKS OF HIGH-INTENSITY RESISTANCE AEROBIC CIRCUIT EXERCISE TRAINING ON EPIGENETIC AGING AND INFLAMMATION IN OLDER HIV-INFECTED VETERANS
  Leader(s): OURSLER, KRISANN K; MARCONI, VINCENT CHARLES ; RYAN, ALICE S. ;
    SALEM VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX002790 / (2019-2023)
  Core(s):
  The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is the largest U.S. HIV health provider with 64% of these Veterans 50+ years of age. HIV infection in the setting of antiretroviral therapy represents a chronic disease with an advanced aging phenotype manifested as increased cardiovascular disease, sarcopenia, and frailty, primarily driven by systemic inflammation. We found a 42% reduction in VO2peak in ol...
 
7. Project Title: A BALANCED REACH TRAINING PLATFORM TO ADDRESS BALANCE DISORDERS IN OLDER AND NEUROLOGICALLY DISABLED VETERANS
  Leader(s): BARTON, JOSEPH EDWARD; HAFER-MACKO, CHARLENE E ;
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX003096 / (2020-2024)
  Core(s):
  Falls are by far the leading cause of accidental injury and death in older adults. The Veteran population is more severely affected by falls since it is significantly older than the overall population (45% over 65 years of age vs. 13%); and Veterans would benefit substantially more from an accurate diagnosis and treatment of fall propensity. Despite its importance, much is still unknown about the ...
 
8. Project Title: AN ENGINEERING-BASED BALANCE ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING PLATFORM
  Leader(s): BARTON, JOSEPH EDWARD
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I21RX003020 / (2019-2021)
  Core(s):
  Falls are by far the leading cause of accidental injury and death in older adults. The Veteran population ismore severely affected by falls since it is significantly older than the overall population (45% over 65 years ofage vs. 13%), and has a higher prevalence of disability. Thus, Veterans would benefit substantially morefrom an accurate diagnosis and treatment of balance function. Despite its i...
 
9. Project Title: EVIDENCE-BASED MULTIDIMENSIONAL PAIN SELF-MANAGEMENT PLANNING: PERSONALIZED BY AND FOR VETERANS VIA WEB-BASED APPLICATION
  Leader(s): HOGANS, BETH B
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I21RX003169 / (2020-2021)
  Core(s):
  Chronic low back pain is highly prevalent in Veterans, and is often resistant to pharmacological management so that non-pharmacological management is required. For many patients, the most effective approach is comprehensive pain management incorporating multiple therapies addressing: physical, mental, mind-body, sleep, safety, and environmental needs. The ultimate outcome is the development of a c...
 
10. Project Title: EXERCISE AND WEIGHT LOSS TO IMPROVE MOBILITY FUNCTION IN VETERANS WITH PAD
  Leader(s): ADDISON, ODESSA
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA IK2RX001788 / (2016-2021)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects an estimated 12 -15 million adults in the US and an estimated 20% of older Veterans. Those with PAD ambulate with slow gait and experience decreased leg strength, dysmobility, reduced quality of life, serious morbidity and often premature death. It is estimated that over 60% of individuals with PAD are overweight or obese. While PAD...
 
11. Project Title: A FEASIBILITY AND PILOT STUDY OF COMBINED TREATMENT PROTOCOL USING AEROBIC EXERCISE AND DULOXETINE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH SYMPTOMATIC KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS AND COMORBID DEPRESSION
  Leader(s): RATHBUN, ALAN MICHAEL
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH K01AG064041 / (2019-2024)
  Core(s):
  Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) affects 10% of men and 13% of women 60 years or older, anddepressive symptoms are common, estimated to be prevalent in one-fifth of these patients. Depressivesymptoms worsen knee OA disease severity and are a barrier to pain management and engagement inphysical activity. Clinical care guidelines recommend depression treatment in older adults with knee OA butpro...
 
12. Project Title: Comparative effectiveness of pulmonary embolism prevention after hip and knee replacement (PEPPER): balancing safety and effectiveness
  Leader(s): PELLEGRINI, VINCENT
    DARTMOUTH-HITCHCOCK MEDICAL CENTER
    PCORI PCS-1402-09328 / (4019316-4710530)
  Core(s):
  Nearly 1 million total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacements are performed each year in the United States, and comprise the largest single type of operation paid for by Medicare. Because disturbing the bone marrow cavity turns on the blood clotting system in humans, these operations are often complicated by formation of blood clots in the veins of the leg (deep vein thrombosis, DVT). Sometimes, th...
 
13. Project Title: A practical intervention to improve patient-centered outcomes after hip fractures among older adults (REGAIN Trial)
  Leader(s): NEUMAN, MARK
    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSLYVANIA
    PCORI PCS-1406-18876 / (3932737-4623951)
  Core(s):
  Hip fractures occur more than 300,000 times each year among older US adults; the vast majority of patients undergo surgery that requires anesthesia. One year after fracture, 50 percent of previously independent patients have died or require nursing home placement, and 40 percent of survivors who previously walked independently need help to walk 10 feet. The REGAIN trial (REgional versus General An...
 
14. Project Title: LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF KNEE OA IN THE OAI COHORT
  Leader(s): NEVITT, MICHAEL C; JACKSON, REBECCA D ;
    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO
    NIH R01AG050469 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain, functional limitation and disability and among the most costly musculoskeletal conditions. A burgeoning population with knee OA and poor clinical outcomes in the absence of effective treatments are key drivers of the soaring rates and costs of knee replacement. Knee OA pathology and clinical outcomes...
 
15. Project Title: COMBINING TESTOSTERONE THERAPY AND EXERCISE TO IMPROVE FUNCTION POST HIP FRACTURE
  Leader(s): BINDER, ELLEN F; KIEL, DOUGLAS P. ; MAGAZINER, JAY ; ORWIG, DENISE L ; SCHECHTMAN, KENNETH B. ; SCHWARTZ, ROBERT S ; VOLPI, ELENA ;
    WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG051647 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  Hip fractures are common among older women and can have a devastating impact on their ability toremain independent. A clinically important functional decline and failure to recover following a hip fracture hasbeen documented as much as a year after the fracture, even among individuals who were functioning at highlevels before the event. Age-associated androgen deficiency in women contributes to de...
 
16. Project Title: HIP MUSCLE POWER, LATERAL BALANCE FUNCTION, AND FALLS IN AGING
  Leader(s): GRAY, VICKI L.
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01AG060051 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  Project Summary/Abstract Falls and their consequences are among the major problems in the medical care of older individuals.The long-term goal of this research is to a mechanistically derived therapeutic intervention to enhance musclepower, weight-shifting capability, and lateral balance to prevent falls. When human balance is challenged,protective stepping is a vital strategy for preventing a fal...
 
17. Project Title: MECHANISMS OF OSTEOCYTE MECHANO-SIGNALING AND SCLEROSTIN REGULATION
  Leader(s): STAINS, JOSEPH P.; WARD, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01AR071614 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARYOsteoporosis and other diseases of skeletal fragility affect more than 200 million people worldwide andcontributes to ~9 million factures annually. Preventing bone loss and/or restoring lost bone mass in patients isof vital importance to limiting the personal and economic impact of diseases of skeletal fragility. A key target inthe stimulation of new bone formation is the protein sc...
 
18. Project Title: CHEMO-MECHANICAL SIGNALING IN ATRIAL MYOCYTES
  Leader(s): LEDERER, WILLIAM JONATHAN; WARD, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01HL142290 / (2019-2022)
  Core(s):
  Atrial myocyte cell biology will be examined in isolated single cells in vitro and mice in vivo tocharacterize quantitatively how chemo-mechanical signaling works in health and disease. This signalingpathway is activated by changes in myocyte shape as happens when the atria fill with blood, and myocytesstretch, during diastolic filling. Using extremely high temporal and spatial resolution imaging ...
 
19. Project Title: SHOULDER PAIN, ROTATOR CUFF TEAR, COORDINATION, AND MOBILITY IN AGING
  Leader(s): DAVIS, DERIK L
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R03AG067927 / (2020-2022)
  Core(s):
  Mobility limitation is a major burden to public health, affecting one-third of adults 65 years and older. Mobility limitation is predictive of disability, hospitalization, falls and mortality in older populations. The contribution of lower limb dysfunction to mobility limitation is well established. The influence of upper-limb dysfunction on mobility performance is less well understood. Shoulder p...
 
20. Project Title: INCREASING MUSCLE CAPILLARIZATION TO ENHANCE RESPONSES TO STRENGTH TRAINING IN SARCOPENIA
  Leader(s): PRIOR, STEVEN J
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND COLLEGE PK CAMPUS
    NIH R21AG064571 / (2019-2021)
  Core(s):
  Sarcopenia, or the aging-related loss of muscle mass, affects >15% of individuals over 70 years of age,and the additional loss of muscle mass after this age can reach 15% per decade. The presence of sarcopeniais associated with physical disability, poor quality of life, all-cause mortality, and direct health care costsamounting to $18.5 billion per year. Reducing the prevalence and consequences of...
 
21. Project Title: BUILDING TRUST TO ENHANCE DIVERSITY IN AGING RESEARCH
  Leader(s): MULLINS, C. DANIEL; MAGAZINER, JAY ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R24AG063728 / (2019-2022)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACTAging Research focuses on aging processes, age-related diseases, and special problems andneeds of older adults. Aging Research helps us to understand the nature of aging and how bestto extend the healthy, active years of life. Greater diversity among the populations engaged inAging Research studies is essential in order to understand the complex relationships amonghealth st...
 
22. Project Title: ADVANCING GERIATRICS INFRASTRUCTURE & NETWORK GROWTH (AGING) INITIATIVE
  Leader(s): GURWITZ, JERRY H
    UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTER
    NIH R33AG057806 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY / ABSTRACTThe Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN)-Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs)AGING (Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth) Initiative, funded under an R24 grantmechanism (R24 AG045050), was initiated in 2014 to foster collaborations between HCSRN and OAIC (akaPepper Centers) investigators in order to advance an interdisciplinary research a...
 
23. Project Title: METHODS TO TEST LIFESTYLE, VAGINAL MICROENVIRONMENT, AND GENITOURINARY SYMPTOMS ACROSS MENOPAUSE TRANSITION
  Leader(s): SHARDELL, MICHELLE DENISE; BROTMAN, REBECCA M. ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R56AG068673 / (2020-2021)
  Core(s):
  Over 50% of postmenopausal women are affected by the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM), which includes vaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, and sexual dysfunction. Symptoms worsen if untreated and are associated with stress and depression. Estrogen decline in menopause is thought to lead to reduced glycogen accumulation in the vaginal epithelium and is associated with low vaginal Lactobacillu...
 
24. Project Title: RESEARCH TRAINING IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF AGING.
  Leader(s): MAGAZINER, JAY
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH T32AG000262 / (1998-2023)
  Core(s):
  AbstractThe aging of the United States population highlights the need for increased interdisciplinary research on diseasesand disabilities that affect older persons. The objective of years 21 25 of this successful program is to continuetraining 5 pre- and 2 postdoctoral fellows to conduct independent and original research in the epidemiology ofaging, with an emphasis on the prevention of late li...
 
25. Project Title: INTERCOLLABORATIVE RADIATION COUNTERMEASURE (INTERACT) CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES TO MITIGATE/TREAT ACUTE AND DELAYED RADIATION SYNDROMES
  Leader(s): VUJASKOVIC, ZELJKO
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH U19AI150574 / (2020-2025)
  Core(s):
  The Inter-collaborative Radiation Countermeasures (INTERACT) Consortium was assembled for the overall goal of developing safe and effective medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate and/or treat the acute, delayed, and long-term consequences of radiation exposure for all subsets of the civilian population in the event of a radiological or nuclear (RadNuc) public health emergency. The biological co...
 
26. Project Title: DEVELOPING AN NIA RESEARCH CENTERS COLLABORATIVE NETWORK (RCCN)
  Leader(s): KRITCHEVSKY, STEPHEN B.; LEDERMAN, STEPHANIE ;
    WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH U24AG058556 / (2018-2021)
  Core(s):
  Project Summary/AbstractThe problems associated with an aging society transcend the boundaries of any specificdiscipline and play out across multiple biologic and societal domains ranging from individualcells, to organs and organ systems, to persons, to communities, to national and worldeconomies. The six National Institute on Aging center programs address important topics inaging but typically th...
 
PUBLICATIONS
2021
  1. Race and other sociodemographic categories are differentially linked to multiple dimensions of interpersonal-level discrimination: Implications for intersectional, health research.
    Beatty Moody DL, Waldstein SR, Leibel DK, Hoggard LS, Gee GC, Ashe JJ, Brondolo E, Al-Najjar E, Evans MK, Zonderman AB
    PLoS One, 2021, 16(5): e0251174
    https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0251174 | PMID: 34010303 | PMCID: PMC8133471
    Citations: | AltScore: 4
  2. B and T Cell Immunity in Tissues and Across the Ages.
    Booth JS, Toapanta FR
    Vaccines (Basel), 2021 Jan 6, 9(1):
    pii: E24. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9010024 | PMID: 33419014 | PMCID: PMC7825307
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2.85
  3. Untangling biomechanical differences in perturbation-induced stepping strategies for lateral balance stability in older individuals.
    Borrelli J, Creath R, Gray VL, Rogers MW
    J Biomech, 2021 Jan 4, 114: 110161
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.110161 | PMID: 33316540 | PMCID: PMC7778461
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  4. Feasibility and effects of high-intensity interval training in older adults living with HIV.
    Briggs BC, Ryan AS, Sorkin JD, Oursler KK
    J Sports Sci, 2021 Feb, 39(3): 304-311
    https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2020.1818949 | PMID: 32962523
    Citations: | AltScore: 1
  5. Effects of exercise training with weight loss on skeletal muscle expression of angiogenic factors in overweight and obese older men.
    Evans WS, Blumenthal JB, Heilman JM, Ryan AS, Prior SJ
    J Appl Physiol (1985), 2021 May 20
    https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00084.2021 | PMID: 34013746
    Citations: | AltScore: 6.05
  6. Association between Physical Activity and Mortality in Patients with Claudication.
    Gardner AW, Addison O, Katzel LI, Montgomery PS, Prior SJ, Serra MC, Sorkin JD
    Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2021 Apr 1, 53(4): 732-739
    https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002526 | PMID: 32991346 | PMCID: PMC7969371
    Citations: | AltScore: 34.3
  7. IL-6 and Soluble Receptors in Overweight and Obese African American Women With and Without Breast Cancer.
    Griffith KA, Ryan AS
    Biol Res Nurs, 2021 Apr, 23(2): 218-222
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1099800420945787 | PMID: 32748635
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  8. Low Back Pain and Substance Use: Diagnostic and Administrative Coding for Opioid Use and Dependence Increased in U.S. Older Adults with Low Back Pain.
    Hogans BB, Siaton BC, Taylor MN, Katzel LI, Sorkin JD
    Pain Med, 2021 Apr 20, 22(4): 836-847
    https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnaa428 | PMID: 33594426
    Citations: | AltScore: 3.7
  9. Age-dependent changes in nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling in skeletal muscle.
    Iyer SR, Hsia RC, Folker ES, Lovering RM
    Exp Gerontol, 2021 Jul 15, 150: 111338
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2021.111338 | PMID: 33862137 | PMCID: PMC8165001
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.25
  10. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is associated with cerebral hypoperfusion.
    Khan AA, Patel J, Desikan S, Chrencik M, Martinez-Delcid J, Caraballo B, Yokemick J, Gray VL, Sorkin JD, Cebral J, Sikdar S, Lal BK
    J Vasc Surg, 2021 May, 73(5): 1611-1621.e2
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.10.063 | PMID: 33166609
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 0.25
  11. The Effect of Frailty on Walking Recovery after Hip Fracture: A Secondary Analysis of the Community Ambulation Project.
    Mangione KK, Craik RL, Kenny A, Memaj A, Miller MF, Chen M, Weingart M, Orwig D, Magaziner J
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2021 Feb 12
    pii: glab044. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glab044 | PMID: 33575796
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  12. Four Square Step Test Performance in Hip Fracture Patients.
    Mutchie HL, Orwig DL, Beamer B, Conroy V, Guralnik J, Magaziner J, Gruber-Baldini AL
    J Geriatr Phys Ther, 2021 Apr 28
    https://doi.org/10.1519/JPT.0000000000000310 | PMID: 33935219
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  13. Change in vertebral strength and bone mineral density in men and women over the year post-hip fracture: a subgroup analysis.
    Orwig DL, Kopperdahl D, Keaveny T, Magaziner J, Hochberg M
    Arch Osteoporos, 2021 Feb 22, 16(1): 37
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-021-00907-8 | PMID: 33619589 | PMCID: PMC8183184
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  14. Telehealth Exercise Intervention in Older Adults With HIV: Protocol of a Multisite Randomized Trial.
    Oursler KK, Marconi VC, Briggs BC, Sorkin JD, Ryan AS, FIT VET Project Team.
    J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care, 2021 Jan 20
    https://doi.org/10.1097/JNC.0000000000000235 | PMID: 33481463
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  15. Coronavirus disease 2019 and clinical research in U.S. nursing homes.
    Quinn CC, Adams AS, Magaziner JS, Gurwitz JH
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2021 Apr 19
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.17191 | PMID: 33872385
    Citations: | AltScore: 7.4
  16. Testing the Impact of FFC-AL-EIT on Psychosocial and Behavioral Outcomes in Assisted Living.
    Resnick B, Boltz M, Galik E, Fix S, Holmes S, Zhu S, Barr E
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2021 Feb, 69(2): 459-466
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16886 | PMID: 33095469 | PMCID: PMC8116977
    Citations: | AltScore: 3.25
  17. Augmented exercise pressor response during maximal treadmill exercise is not related to systemic inflammation in stroke survivors.
    Sprick JD, Serra MC, Ryan AS, Li Y, Park J
    Top Stroke Rehabil, 2021 May, 28(4): 251-257
    https://doi.org/10.1080/10749357.2020.1806436 | PMID: 32783602 | PMCID: PMC7878569
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.5
  18. The Effect of High Protein and Mobility-Based Rehabilitation on Clinical Outcomes in Survivors of Critical Illness.
    Wappel S, Tran DH, Wells CL, Verceles AC
    Respir Care, 2021 Jan, 66(1): 73-78
    https://doi.org/10.4187/respcare.07840 | PMID: 32817444
    Citations: | AltScore: 25.15
  19. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on posture, movement planning, and execution during standing voluntary reach following stroke.
    Yang CL, Gad A, Creath RA, Magder L, Rogers MW, Waller SM
    J Neuroeng Rehabil, 2021 Jan 7, 18(1): 5
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12984-020-00799-8 | PMID: 33413441 | PMCID: PMC7791870
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  20. Predictors of the start of declining eGFR in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.
    Yip TC, Saria S, Petri M, Magder LS
    Lupus, 2021 Jan, 30(1): 15-24
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0961203320966393 | PMID: 33115373 | PMCID: PMC7770013
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.5
 
2020
  1. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and High-Protein Supplementation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Badjatia N, Sanchez S, Judd G, Hausladen R, Hering D, Motta M, Parikh G, Chang W, Morris N, Simard JM, Sorkin J, Wittenberg GF, Ryan AS
    Neurocrit Care, 2020 Nov 4
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-020-01138-4 | PMID: 33150572 | PMCID: PMC8093316
    Citations: | AltScore: 27.25
  2. Effect of Doxycycline on Aneurysm Growth Among Patients With Small Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Baxter BT, Matsumura J, Curci JA, McBride R, Larson L, Blackwelder W, Lam D, Wijesinha M, Terrin M, N-TA3CT Investigators.
    JAMA, 2020 May 26, 323(20): 2029-2038
    https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.5230 | PMID: 32453369 | PMCID: PMC7251450
    Citations: 5 | AltScore: 159.35
  3. An Outreach Rehabilitation Program for Nursing Home Residents after Hip Fracture may be Cost-Saving.
    Beaupre LA, Lier D, Magaziner JS, Jones CA, Johnston DWC, Wilson DM, Majumdar SR
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Mar 26, 75(10): e159-e165
    pii: glaa074. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa074 | PMID: 32215562 | PMCID: PMC7750683
    Citations: | AltScore: 7.05
  4. Vitamin D, Folate, and Cobalamin Serum Concentrations Are Related to Brain Volume and White Matter Integrity in Urban Adults.
    Beydoun MA, Shaked D, Hossain S, Beydoun HA, Katzel LI, Davatzikos C, Gullapalli RP, Seliger SL, Erus G, Evans MK, Zonderman AB, Waldstein SR
    Front Aging Neurosci, 2020, 12: 140
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2020.00140 | PMID: 32523528 | PMCID: PMC7261885
    Citations: | AltScore: 10.7
  5. A Propensity Score Matched Study of the Positive Impact of Infectious Diseases Consultation on Antimicrobial Appropriateness in Hospitalized Patients with Antimicrobial Stewardship Oversight.
    Bork JT, Claeys KC, Heil EL, Banoub M, Leekha S, Sorkin JD, Kleinberg M
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 2020 Jul 22, 64(8):
    pii: e00307-20. https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00307-20 | PMID: 32423952 | PMCID: PMC7526803
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 19.4
  6. The relationship between sleep-disordered breathing, blood pressure, and urinary cortisol and catecholamines in children.
    Brooks DM, Kelly A, Sorkin JD, Koren D, Chng SY, Gallagher PR, Amin R, Dougherty S, Guo R, Marcus CL, Brooks LJ
    J Clin Sleep Med, 2020 Jun 15, 16(6): 907-916
    https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.8360 | PMID: 32043963 | PMCID: PMC7849664
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.75
  7. Putative Cut-Points in Sarcopenia Components and Incident Adverse Health Outcomes: An SDOC Analysis.
    Cawthon PM, Manini T, Patel SM, Newman A, Travison T, Kiel DP, Santanasto AJ, Ensrud KE, Xue QL, Shardell M, Duchowny K, Erlandson KM, Pencina KM, Fielding RA, Magaziner J, Kwok T, Karlsson M, Ohlsson C, Mellstr?m D, Hirani V, Ribom E, Correa-de-Araujo R, Bhasin S
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Jul, 68(7): 1429-1437
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16517 | PMID: 32633824 | PMCID: PMC7508260
    Citations: 9 | AltScore: 2.5
  8. Comparing Longitudinal Sarcopenia Trends by Definitions Across Men and Women After Hip Fracture.
    Chiles Shaffer N, Huang Y, Abraham DS, Cheng YJ, Lu W, Gruber-Baldini AL, Hochberg MC, Guralnik J, Magaziner J, Orwig D
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Apr 1, 68(7): 1537-1544
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16417 | PMID: 32239496 | PMCID: PMC7416476
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 8.43
  9. High prevalence of chronic venous disease among health care workers in the United States.
    Cires-Drouet RS, Fangyang L, Rosenberger S, Startzel M, Kidwell M, Yokemick J, McDonald T, Carlin M, Sharma J, Sorkin JD, Lal BK
    J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord, 2020 Mar, 8(2): 224-230
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvsv.2019.10.017 | PMID: 32067727 | PMCID: PMC7375188
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  10. Safety of exercise therapy after acute pulmonary embolism.
    Cires-Drouet RS, Mayorga-Carlin M, Toursavadkohi S, White R, Redding E, Durham F, Dondero K, Prior SJ, Sorkin JD, Lal BK
    Phlebology, 2020 Dec, 35(10): 824-832
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0268355520946625 | PMID: 32720853
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.35
  11. Two Approaches to Classifying and Quantifying Physical Resilience in Longitudinal Data.
    Col?n-Emeric C, Pieper CF, Schmader KE, Sloane R, Bloom A, McClain M, Magaziner J, Huffman KM, Orwig D, Crabtree DM, Whitson HE
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Mar 9, 75(4): 731-738
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz097 | PMID: 30993327 | PMCID: PMC7328208
    Citations: 6 | AltScore: 14.2
  12. The SENIEUR protocol and the efficacy of hepatitis B vaccination in healthy elderly persons by age, gender, and vaccine route.
    Edelman R, Deming ME, Toapanta FR, Heuser MD, Chrisley L, Barnes RS, Wasserman SS, Blackwelder WC, Handwerger BS, Pasetti M, Siddiqui KM, Sztein MB
    Immun Ageing, 2020, 17: 9
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12979-020-00179-9 | PMID: 32355503 | PMCID: PMC7187507
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: NA
  13. Application of Selected Muscle Strength and Body Mass Cut Points for the Diagnosis of Sarcopenia in Men and Women With or at Risk for HIV Infection.
    Erlandson KM, Travison TG, Zhu H, Magaziner J, Correa-de-Araujo R, Cawthon PM, Bhasin S, Manini T, Fielding RA, Palella FJ, Kingsley L, Lake JE, Sharma A, Tien PC, Weber KM, Yin MT, Brown TT
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Jun 18, 75(7): 1338-1345
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa083 | PMID: 32301484 | PMCID: PMC7302174
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 3.1
  14. Contraction Phase and Force Differentially Change Motor Evoked Potential Recruitment Slope and Interhemispheric Inhibition in Young Versus Old.
    Ermer E, Harcum S, Lush J, Magder LS, Whitall J, Wittenberg GF, Dimyan MA
    Front Hum Neurosci, 2020, 14: 581008
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.581008 | PMID: 33132888 | PMCID: PMC7573560
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  15. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Total Hip Arthroplasty: A?Multicenter Comparison Based on Surgical Approaches.
    Finch DJ, Martin BI, Franklin PD, Magder LS, Pellegrini VD Jr, PEPPER Investigators.
    J Arthroplasty, 2020 Apr, 35(4): 1029-1035.e3
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2019.10.017 | PMID: 31926776
    Citations: 3 | AltScore: 34.4
  16. The Effects of Bundled Payment Programs for Hip and Knee Arthroplasty on Patient-Reported Outcomes.
    Finch DJ, Pellegrini VD Jr, Franklin PD, Magder LS, Pelt CE, Martin BI, PEPPER Investigators.
    J Arthroplasty, 2020 Apr, 35(4): 918-925.e7
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2019.11.028 | PMID: 32001083
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: NA
  17. Lateral Perturbation-Induced and Voluntary Stepping in Fallers and Nonfallers After Stroke.
    Gray VL, Fujimoto M, Rogers MW
    Phys Ther, 2020 Jun 12, 100(9): 1557-1567
    pii: pzaa109. https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzaa109 | PMID: 32529236 | PMCID: PMC7608778
    Citations: | AltScore: 2.6
  18. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is associated with mobility and cognitive dysfunction and heightens falls in older adults.
    Gray VL, Goldberg AP, Rogers MW, Anthony L, Terrin ML, Guralnik JM, Blackwelder WC, Lam DFH, Sikdar S, Lal BK
    J Vasc Surg, 2020 Jun, 71(6): 1930-1937
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2019.09.020 | PMID: 31699511 | PMCID: PMC7196504
    Citations: 3 | AltScore: 11.65
  19. Mimickers of Hill-Sachs Lesions.
    Herring A, Davis DL
    Can Assoc Radiol J, 2020 Feb 6, 72(2): 258-270
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0846537119895751 | PMID: 32063021 | PMCID: PMC7415664
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.5
  20. A Robust Impedance Controller Design for Series Elastic Actuators using the Singular Perturbation Theory.
    Kim D, Koh K, Cho GR, Zhang LQ
    IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron, 2020 Feb, 25(1): 164-174
    https://doi.org/10.1109/tmech.2019.2951417 | PMID: 32431485 | PMCID: PMC7236756
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  21. Burden of perianal Staphylococcus aureus colonization in nursing home residents increases transmission to healthcare worker gowns and gloves.
    Kim JJ, Johnson JK, Stucke EM, Sorkin JD, Zhao L, Lydecker A, Mody L, Roghmann MC
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, 2020 Dec, 41(12): 1396-1401
    https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.336 | PMID: 32762778
    Citations: | AltScore: 1
  22. Circulating microparticle concentrations across acute and chronic cardiovascular disease conditions.
    Landers-Ramos RQ, Addison OA, Beamer B, Katzel LI, Blumenthal JB, Robinson S, Hagberg JM, Prior SJ
    Physiol Rep, 2020 Aug, 8(15): e14534
    https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14534 | PMID: 32748505 | PMCID: PMC7399362
    Citations: | AltScore: 2
  23. Kinetic, muscle structure, and neuromuscular determinants of weight transfer phase prior to a lateral choice reaction step in older adults.
    Lanza MB, Addison O, Ryan AS, J Perez W, Gray V
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol, 2020 Dec, 55: 102484
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2020.102484 | PMID: 33176230
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  24. Intramuscular Fat Influences Neuromuscular Activation of the Gluteus Medius in Older Adults.
    Lanza MB, Ryan AS, Gray V, Perez WJ, Addison O
    Front Physiol, 2020, 11: 614415
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2020.614415 | PMID: 33362586 | PMCID: PMC7758409
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 15.45
  25. Relations of Executive Function and Physical Performance in Middle Adulthood: A Prospective Investigation in African American and White Adults.
    Leibel DK, Williams MR, Katzel LI, Evans MK, Zonderman AB, Waldstein SR
    J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci, 2020 Jun 2, 75(6): e56-e68
    https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa012 | PMID: 31993650 | PMCID: PMC7265814
    Citations: | AltScore: 4.65
  26. Skeletal Muscle Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 and Glucose Metabolism in Older Adults after Exercise and Weight Loss.
    Li G, Zhang H, Ryan AS
    Metabolites, 2020 Aug 31, 10(9):
    pii: E354. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10090354 | PMID: 32878157 | PMCID: PMC7570075
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 0.25
  27. Aerobic Exercise Recommendations to Optimize Best Practices in Care After Stroke: AEROBICS 2019 Update.
    MacKay-Lyons M, Billinger SA, Eng JJ, Dromerick A, Giacomantonio N, Hafer-Macko C, Macko R, Nguyen E, Prior P, Suskin N, Tang A, Thornton M, Unsworth K
    Phys Ther, 2020 Jan 23, 100(1): 149-156
    https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzz153 | PMID: 31596465
    Citations: 8 | AltScore: 36.15
  28. Social capital and cost-related medication nonadherence (CRN): A retrospective longitudinal cohort study using the Health and Retirement Study data, 2006-2016.
    Majercak KR, Magder LS, Villalonga-Olives E
    SSM Popul Health, 2020 Dec, 12: 100671
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssmph.2020.100671 | PMID: 33088892 | PMCID: PMC7559535
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  29. Identification of Sarcopenia Components That Discriminate Slow Walking Speed: A Pooled Data Analysis.
    Manini TM, Patel SM, Newman AB, Travison TG, Kiel DP, Shardell MD, Pencina KM, Wilson KE, Kelly TL, Massaro JM, Fielding RA, Magaziner J, Correa-de-Araujo R, Kwok TCY, Hirani V, Karlsson MK, D'Agostino RB Sr, Mellstr?m D, Ohlsson C, Ribom E, Jordan JM, Bhasin S, Cawthon PM
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Jul, 68(7): 1419-1428
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16524 | PMID: 32633834 | PMCID: PMC8018524
    Citations: 5 | AltScore: 2.5
  30. Effect of Icosapent Ethyl on Gynoid Fat and Bone Mineral Health in the Metabolic Syndrome: A Preliminary Report.
    Miller M, Ryan A, Reed RM, Goggins C, Sorkin J, Goldberg AP
    Clin Ther, 2020 Nov, 42(11): 2226-2230
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.09.005 | PMID: 32967775
    Citations: | AltScore: 3
  31. The incidence of persistent postoperative opioid use among U.S. veterans: A national study to identify risk factors.
    Namiranian K, Siglin J, Sorkin JD
    J Clin Anesth, 2021 Feb, 68: 110079
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2020.110079 | PMID: 33010491 | PMCID: PMC7750291
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  32. Postoperative opioid misuse in patients with opioid use disorders maintained on opioid agonist treatment.
    Namiranian K, Siglin J, Sorkin JD, Norris EJ, Aghevli M, Covington EC
    J Subst Abuse Treat, 2020 Feb, 109: 8-13
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2019.10.007 | PMID: 31856954 | PMCID: PMC7416727
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 0.25
  33. Effects of Proximity between Companion Dogs and Their Caregivers on Heart Rate Variability Measures in Older Adults: A Pilot Study.
    Ortmeyer HK, Katzel LI
    Int J Environ Res Public Health, 2020 Apr 13, 17(8):
    pii: E2674. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082674 | PMID: 32295094 | PMCID: PMC7215279
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 27.55
  34. Application of SDOC Cut-points for Low Muscle Strength for Recovery of Walking Speed After Hip Fracture.
    Orwig D, Magaziner J, Fielding RA, Zhu H, Binder EF, Cawthon PM, Bhasin S, Correa-de-Araujo R, Manini T, Patel S, Shardell M, Travison TG
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Apr 3, 75(7): 1379-1385
    pii: glaa076. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa076 | PMID: 32242218 | PMCID: PMC7302178
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 9.2
  35. Biomarkers Associated with Physical Resilience After Hip Fracture.
    Parker DC, Coln-Emeric C, Huebner JL, Chou CH, Kraus VB, Pieper CF, Sloane R, Whitson HE, Orwig D, Crabtree DM, Magaziner J, Bain JR, Muehlbauer M, Ilkayeva OR, Huffman KM
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 May 9, 75(10): e166-e172
    pii: glaa119. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa119 | PMID: 32386291 | PMCID: PMC7518564
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 1.25
  36. Selection Bias, Orthopaedic Style: Knowing What We Don't Know About Aspirin.
    Pellegrini VD Jr, Eikelboom J, McCollister Evarts C, Franklin PD, Goldhaber SZ, Iorio R, Lambourne CA, Magaziner JS, Magder LS, Steering Committee of The PEPPER Trial.
    J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2020 Apr 1, 102(7): 631-633
    https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.19.01135 | PMID: 31895235 | PMCID: PMC7289131
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 16.9
  37. Neurocognitive measures predict voluntary stepping performance in older adults post-hip fracture.
    Pizac DA, Savin DN, Orwig D, Gruber-Baldini A, Creath R, Conroy V, Hochberg M, Beamer BA, Magaziner J, Rogers MW
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), 2020 Nov 12, 81: 105234
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2020.105234 | PMID: 33213932 | PMCID: PMC8183182
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  38. Relationship Between Depression and Disease Activity in United States Veterans With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Receiving Methotrexate.
    Rathbun AM, England BR, Mikuls TR, Ryan AS, Barton JL, Shardell MD, Hochberg MC
    J Rheumatol, 2020 Nov 15
    pii: jrheum.200743. https://doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.200743 | PMID: 33191277 | PMCID: PMC8121898
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.5
  39. Depression Subtypes in Individuals With or at Risk for Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis.
    Rathbun AM, Schuler MS, Stuart EA, Shardell MD, Yau MS, Gallo JJ, Ryan AS, Hochberg MC
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken), 2020 May, 72(5): 669-678
    https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23898 | PMID: 30951261 | PMCID: PMC7176152
    Citations: 5 | AltScore: 10.25
  40. Association between disease progression and depression onset in persons with radiographic knee osteoarthritis.
    Rathbun AM, Shardell MD, Ryan AS, Yau MS, Gallo JJ, Schuler MS, Stuart EA, Hochberg MC
    Rheumatology (Oxford), 2020 Apr 24, 59(11): 3390-3399
    pii: keaa141. https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keaa141 | PMID: 32333000 | PMCID: PMC7590406
    Citations: | AltScore: 4.85
  41. Covid-19 lessons learned from the voices of our geriatric nurses: Leadership, resilience, and heroism.
    Resnick B
    Geriatr Nurs, 2020 Jul - Aug, 41(4): 357-359
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2020.06.008 | PMID: 32680676 | PMCID: PMC7301055
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 8.008
  42. Transitions of care from our inception to COVID-19: What have we learned?
    Resnick B
    Geriatr Nurs, 2020 Jul - Aug, 41(4): 355-356
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2020.06.009 | PMID: 32591268 | PMCID: PMC7301121
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  43. Impact of Function Focused Care and Physical Activity on Falls in Assisted Living Residents.
    Resnick B, Galik E, Boltz M, Zhu S, Fix S, Vigne E
    Can J Nurs Res, 2020 Mar, 52(1): 45-53
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0844562119856224 | PMID: 31225738 | PMCID: PMC6925355
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: NA
  44. Role of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction in CKD.
    Ryan AS
    Clin J Am Soc Nephrol, 2020 Jul 1, 15(7): 912-913
    https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.08050520 | PMID: 32591420 | PMCID: PMC7341784
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2.5
  45. Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle of Chronic Stroke.
    Ryan AS, Hafer-Macko C, Ortmeyer HK
    Brain Sci, 2020 Dec 26, 11(1):
    pii: E20. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010020 | PMID: 33375333 | PMCID: PMC7823711
    Citations: | AltScore: 1
  46. Physical performance measures in older women with urinary incontinence: pelvic floor disorder or geriatric syndrome?
    Sanses TVD, Pearson S, Davis D, Chen CCG, Bentzen S, Guralnik J, Richter HE, Ryan AS
    Int Urogynecol J, 2020 Nov 17, 32(2): 305-315
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-020-04603-y | PMID: 33201269 | PMCID: PMC7856110
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.75
  47. Changes in circulating microRNA and arterial stiffness following high-intensity interval and moderate intensity continuous exercise.
    Sapp RM, Chesney CA, Eagan LE, Evans WS, Zietowski EM, Prior SJ, Hagberg JM, Ranadive SM
    Physiol Rep, 2020 May, 8(9): e14431
    https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14431 | PMID: 32358919 | PMCID: PMC7195557
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 0.75
  48. Dietary and Serum Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acids Are Associated with Physical and Metabolic Function in Stroke Survivors.
    Serra MC, Ryan AS, Hafer-Macko CE, Yepes M, Nahab FB, Ziegler TR
    Nutrients, 2020 Mar 6, 12(3):
    pii: E701. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030701 | PMID: 32155696 | PMCID: PMC7146193
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 0.5
  49. Incidence of Postoperative Opioid Overdose and New Diagnosis of Opioid Use Disorder Among US Veterans.
    Siglin J, Sorkin JD, Namiranian K
    Am J Addict, 2020 Jul, 29(4): 295-304
    https://doi.org/10.1111/ajad.13022 | PMID: 32202000 | PMCID: PMC7416726
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: NA
  50. Reducing Inpatient Hypoglycemia in the General Wards Using Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring: The Glucose Telemetry System, a Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Singh LG, Satyarengga M, Marcano I, Scott WH, Pinault LF, Feng Z, Sorkin JD, Umpierrez GE, Spanakis EK
    Diabetes Care, 2020 Nov, 43(11): 2736-2743
    https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0840 | PMID: 32759361 | PMCID: PMC7576426
    Citations: 3 | AltScore: 70.35
  51. Association of glucose variability at the last day of hospitalization with 30-day readmission in adults with diabetes.
    Spanakis EK, Singh LG, Siddiqui T, Sorkin JD, Notas G, Magee MF, Fink JC, Zhan M, Umpierrez GE
    BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care, 2020 May, 8(1):
    pii: e000990. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2019-000990 | PMID: 32398351 | PMCID: PMC7222883
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: NA
  52. Home Exercise Interventions in Frail Older Adults.
    Stookey AD, Katzel LI
    Curr Geriatr Rep, 2020 Sep, 9(3): 163-175
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s13670-020-00326-6 | PMID: 34084693 | PMCID: PMC8171269
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  53. Ambulatory Status Is Associated With Successful Discharge Home in Survivors of Critical Illness.
    Tran DH, Maheshwari P, Nagaria Z, Patel HY, Verceles AC
    Respir Care, 2020 Mar 31, 65(8): 1168-1173
    pii: respcare.07437. https://doi.org/10.4187/respcare.07437 | PMID: 32234767 | PMCID: PMC7538008
    Citations: | AltScore: 6.65
  54. Vitamin K Intake in Chronic Stroke: Implications for Dietary Recommendations.
    Wessinger C, Hafer-Macko C, S Ryan A
    Nutrients, 2020 Oct 6, 12(10):
    pii: E3059. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103059 | PMID: 33036224 | PMCID: PMC7599637
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 19.3
  55. Kynurenines link chronic inflammation to functional decline and physical frailty.
    Westbrook R, Chung T, Lovett J, Ward C, Joca H, Yang H, Khadeer M, Tian J, Xue QL, Le A, Ferrucci L, Moaddel R, de Cabo R, Hoke A, Walston J, Abadir PM
    JCI Insight, 2020 Aug 20, 5(16):
    pii: 136091. https://doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.136091 | PMID: 32814718 | PMCID: PMC7455140
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 34.6
  56. PTSD Improvement Associated with Social Connectedness in Gerofit Veterans Exercise Program.
    Wilkins SS, Melrose RJ, Hall KS, Blanchard E, Castle SC, Kopp T, Katzel LI, Holder A, Alexander N, McDonald MKS, Tayade A, Forman DE, Abbate LM, Harris R, Valencia WM, Morey MC, Lee CC
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Dec 23, 69(4): 1045-1050
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16973 | PMID: 33368144
    Citations: | AltScore: 20.68


EXTERNAL ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS

Thomas M. Gill, MD
Yale University
Serving since 2006 (15 years)

Bret Goodpaster, PhD
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Karen Bandeen-Roche, PhD
Johns Hopkins University
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Mark Redfern, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Stephen Kritchevsky, PhD (chair)
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Cynthia Boyd, MD, MPH
Johns Hopkins University
Serving since 2016 (5 years)

LaDora Thompson, PhD, PT
Boston University
Serving since 2018 (3 years)


RECOGNITION AND AWARDS (2020-2021)
Alyssa Stookey, PhD (2020)
  • Time Off Award, Baltimore VA Medical Center, Awarded for contribution to the operations of the Baltimore Annex Senior Exercise Rehabilitation Center resulting in high ratings for quality of care by Veterans.
Derik Davis, MD (2020)
  • Bruce Line Research Prize Award, Department of Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Jack Guralnik, MD, PhD (2020)
  • The Daniel Perry Founder’s Award from the Alliance for Aging Research
Jay Magaziner, PhD, MS Hyg (2020)
  • University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) 2020 Researcher of the Year
Michelle Shardell, PhD (2020)
  • Strategic Initiatives Award for best proposal for “Developing the Next Generation of Biostatisticians,” American Statistical Association Biometrics Section
Tasneem Khambaty, PhD (2020)
  • Early Stage Investigator Fellowship Award from the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research

MINORITY RESEARCH

General Brief Description of Minority Activities:
Not defined.


Minority Trainee(s):
  • Alan Rathbun, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore
    Dr. Rathbun is a musculoskeletal epidemiologist whose current research career is focused in musculoskeletal disorders, epidemiological theory, research study design, causal inference, and applied biostatistics. He currently has a K01 award and collaborating with OAIC investigators on this project.
  • Danielle Beatty Moody, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Dr. Beatty Moody’s area of interest includes relations of early life social disadvantage and perceived discrimination to cardiometabolic and brain health endpoints as a function of race, SES, gender and age. Dr. Shari Waldstein is her department mentor and primary mentor for Dr. Moody’s current K01 (see details below). She continues work on her diversity supplement funded from NIA through the OAIC.
  • Derik Davis, MD, Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore
    Dr. Davis’ current research career is focused in musculoskeletal radiology examining the effects of increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced skeletal muscle (SMM) on cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and functional outcomes in older adults. He collaborates with Claude D. Pepper OAIC studies performing radiology imaging and reading with Dr. Alice Ryan. He also currently has a Diversity Supplement funded from NIA through the OAIC.
  • Derrick Larkins, DPT, PhD Student in the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, School of Medicine
    Dr. Odessa Addison is his primary mentor, and he is interested in muscle quality and injury prevention.
  • Dongwon Kim, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Dr. Kim is a Postdoctoral Fellow of the University of Maryland Baltimore Institute for Clinical & Translational Research (ICTR) / Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA), which supports him to be a clinical research scholar and provides courses for a master degree in area of clinical research. Dr. Kim’s area of research interest includes rehabilitation robotics and works with Dr. Li-Qun Zhang on the relevant topics.
  • Eduardo Alsina, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Mr. Alsina's interests include disparities in the relations of cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., left ventricular mass) to cognitive function and magnetic resonance imaging assessed subclinical brain pathology as a function of race and socioceoncomic status. His master's thesis examined interactive relations left ventricular mass and sociodemographic factors on cognitive outcomes in urban-dwelling African American and White adults. Dr. Shari Waldstein currently serves as his mentor and dissertation chair
  • Jason Ashe, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
    Mr. Ashe’s interests include how religiosity and spirituality might buffer the effects of social adversity on biomedical risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African American adults. His master’s thesis examined the relation of religious coping to telomere length as a function of race and sex. Dr. Shari Waldstein currently serves as his mentor and dissertation chair.
  • Marcel Lanza, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Dr. Lanza’s area of research interest includes falls and stepping recovery and its relationship to muscle. He is co-mentored by Drs. Odessa Addison, Vicki Gray and Alice Ryan.
  • Peter MacIver, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Mr. MacIver’s interests include disparities in relations of cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., Pepper_Annual_Maryland_2020-2021 Generated on: 05/19/2021, 1:53:54 PMblood pressure) to cognitive function and MRI-assessed subclinical brain pathology as a function of race and socioeconomic status. His master’s thesis examined relations of arterial stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity) to cognitive function and associated sociodemographic variation. Dr. Shari Waldstein currently serves as his mentor and dissertation chair.
  • Rebecca Fenderson, 4th year medical student, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Ms. Fenderson is working with Dr. Rainer von Coelln on his current research project that is funded by the UM-OAIC entitled “Towards Next-Generation Phenotyping in Parkinson Disease: Quantitative Analysis of Gait and Balance Using a Portable Biosensor Device”. Working on this project with Dr. von Coelln is part of the Foundations of Research and Critical Thinking program, which is a requirement of the SOM.
  • Shaline Escarfulleri, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
    Ms.Escarfulleri’s interests address the role of emotion processing skills in the biopsychosocial determinants of health. Her master’s thesis examines the relations of negative affect and amygdalar volume to cardiometabolic risk factors as a function of socioeconomic status. Dr. Shari Waldstein current serves as her mentor and master’s thesis chair.

Minority Grant(s):