UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

Principal Investigator    Jay Magaziner, Ph.D.  410-706-3553  jmagazin@som.umaryland.edu
Program Administrator    Anne Sullens, M.A  410-706-1695  asullens@som.umaryland.edu
       
CENTER DESCRIPTION

The mission of the UM-OAIC is to address the process by which function is lost, and the multiple factors that affect the onset and progression of disability. Building on these important perspectives, the UMOAIC focuses on the restoration of function (i.e., enablement) in order to improve function in those with impairments, and prevent or delay further progression in those who are already disabled. This is accomplished by 1) conducting research that examines the mechanisms underlying the functional impairments associated with stroke, hip fracture, and prevalent chronic diseases in older people; 2) designing novel, efficacious exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions that produce clinically relevant outcomes and study the mechanisms underlying them; 3) translating the most efficacious interventions developed in UM-OAIC clinical laboratories and in other clinical centers for implementation and rigorous evaluation outside the clinic (e.g., home, senior center, gym); 4) supporting pilot and exploratory studies (PESs), UM-OAIC junior scholar research, development projects (DPs), and externally funded projects (EP) that examine the mechanisms underlying disability and the process of recovery, and that design and test interventions for the restoration and maintenance of function in clinical laboratories and settings outside the medical center; and 5) fostering the career development of junior faculty/scholars from multiple disciplines into independent, academic scientists with expertise in the study of older persons with disabling diseases through mentor-based, bench-to-bedside translational research training that includes didactic and experiential/practical-applied training in conducting independent, aging research.

The UM-OAIC has three resource cores (RC): Biostatistics, Informatics and Translational Science (RC1); Applied Physiology and Tissue Mechanisms (RC-2); and Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation (RC-3), that serve as a resources for the conduct of innovative exercise and activity-based rehabilitation research. An enhanced Research Education Core (REC) (formerly RCDC) will provide didactic and experiential training under the guidance of an interdisciplinary mentoring team to prepare the next generation of scientists committed to careers in aging research. Center aims will be accomplished by: 1) using multidisciplinary research working groups (RWGs) to provide mentoring and guide REC and PES investigators and faculty scholars in designing and conducting their projects, reporting results, and developing future investigations; 2) supporting studies that determine the mechanisms underlying functional impairments and implement exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions to improve clinically relevant outcomes; and 3) translate safe and efficacious interventions into randomized clinical trials outside the medical center with the goal of changing practice for those with disabling diseases and conditions. The restoration of functional independence through an integrated approach that includes exercise and activity-based rehabilitation will transform the care of older people with disabling diseases and conditions.


CORES
Leadership and Administrative Core (LAC)
Leader 1:    Jay Magaziner, PhD, MS Hyg.   jmagazin@epi.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Leslie I. Katzel, MD   lkatzel@grecc.umaryland.edu
Leader 3:    Alice Ryan, PhD   aryan@grecc.umaryland.edu
The LAC will foster ongoing discussion among core leaders and faculty scholars to ensure that research and research training are carried out in a cohesive, coordinated and integrated manner. The LAC will also engage scientists and educators from across the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) community so that research and research training can take full advantage of the breadth and depth of experience in aging and other relevant areas to facilitate collaborations that advance UM-OAIC goals. The LAC will receive input and guidance and discuss program operations in the Core Leadership Executive Committee (CLEC) of resource core (RC) leaders; the UM-OAIC Research and Education Advisory Committee (REAC) charged with reviewing proposed Development and Pilot/Exploratory Studies; an Internal Advisory Committee (IAC) charged with evaluating UM-OAIC progress and accomplishments and advising on ways to extend research on aging to other university centers and departments; and an External Advisory Board (EAB) that will provide guidance to the program and report progress annually to the NIA. In addition, the LAC will support an Internal Data and Safety Monitoring Board (I-DSMB) that will review the conduct of clinical protocols to ensure patient safety, and an External Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) that will provide another layer of review by experienced scientists who can remain impartial as they monitor data quality and safety, and report to the NIA annually.

Research Education Component (REC)
Leader 1:    Jack Guralnik, MD, PhD, MPH   jguralnik@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Mary-Claire Roghmann, MD, MS   mroghman@epi.umaryland.edu
The purpose of the Research Education Core (REC) is to foster the career development of junior faculty from multiple disciplines into academic scientists in gerontology and geriatrics, focusing on the theme of exercise and activity rehabilitation and recovery research. The REC supports mentor-based research training and education to promote the career development of REC Scholars as well as other junior faculty, fellows, and students pursuing research careers in aging. The UM-OAIC has a successful history of mentored training that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries to develop novel research for improving function and independence in older persons. This has enriched the cadre of scientists at UM and elsewhere conducting aging research in exercise and rehabilitation science.

Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core (PESC)
Leader 1:    Stephen Seliger, MD, MS   sseliger@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Marc Hochberg, MD, MPH, MACP, MACR   mhochber@medicine.umaryland.edu
The purpose of the UM-OAIC Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core (PESC) is to provide critical, initial funding for pilot and exploratory studies that are consistent with the Center’s overall goal, which is to build on the sciences and therapeutic applications of exercise and rehabilitation by: 1) advancing our understanding of the mechanisms by which exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions directed at specific impairments affect multiple body systems underlying functional performance; and 2) developing and testing interventions to restore function and minimize disability following acute disabling events and gradual declines related to serious chronic diseases. To meet this objective, the PESC will provide research support and mentoring of investigators with high quality pilot and exploratory research proposals designed to acquire preliminary data needed for future crucial studies congruent with the Center’s focus: examination of the mechanisms underlying mobility limitation, physical disability, and recovery from disability in vulnerable older adults, and assessment of functional and clinical responses to novel exercise and activity-based rehabilitation interventions.

Applied Physiology and Tissue Mechanisms
Leader 1:    Alice Ryan, PhD   aryan@grecc.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Leslie I. Katzel, MD   lkatzel@grecc.umaryland.edu

Cardiovascular deconditioning, chronic inflammation, and endocrine-metabolic dysfunction are inherent to the pathophysiology of the physical impairments in older persons hindered by disabling chronic diseases of aging. Sarcopenia, poor fitness, inflammation, and acute events causing disability such as falls, stroke, and hip fracture occur with advancing age, which may worsen mobility and increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic abnormalities. RC-2’s hypothesis is that exercise and activity-based rehabilitation can improve multiple physiological systems in older, mobility-limited individuals leading to improved functional performance, reduced cardiometabolic disease risk, and prevention of functional decline.  By determining the composition, molecular, and metabolic abnormalities in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and vascular endothelium, and response to exercise rehabilitation, we can optimize exercise interventions to improve muscle structure, function, metabolism, and CVD risk profiles in older adults with these chronic conditions. Exercise interventions may potentially reduce risk and delay chronic disability in older adults.  To achieve this goal, RC2 implements specific aims that:




Biostatistical Design and Analysis Core (BDAC)
Leader 1:    John D. Sorkin, MD, PhD   jsorkin@grecc.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Michael Terrin, MD, MPH   mterrin@epi.umaryland.edu
Leader 3:    Laurence Magder, PhD   lmagder@epi.umaryland.edu

The goal of the Biostatistics, Informatics, and Translational Resource Core (RC-1), is to provide biostatistical and informatics support to investigators, to help design interventions that prevent functional decline, promote restoration and maintenance of function, and to facilitate the translation of interventions from laboratory to clinic and community. We will participate in Research Working Groups (RWGs), a forum in which investigators from multiple disciplines collaborate on the design and conduct of studies. Our informatics system (GERI) will provide an infrastructure that helps us manage studies and facilitates the flow of information and data. RC-1 draws on the resources and statistical expertise of the UM Department of Epidemiology and Public Health’s Divisions of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, and Gerontology. We share resources and personnel with the biostatistics cores of the Baltimore VA Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), the VA RR&D Maryland Exercise and Robotics Center of Excellence (MERCE), and the UM Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC). The resultant synergy saves money and makes the whole more than the sum of its parts. Statistical methods, hardware purchased and software developed by one center are used by all center.




Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation
Leader 1:    Richard Macko, MD   rmacko@som.umaryland.edu
Leader 2:    Li-Qun (Larry) Zhang, PhD   l-zhang@som.umaryland.edu

The combination of physical impairments and a sedentary lifestyle with aging and chronic conditions such as stroke, hip fracture, metabolic syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, results in multi-system brain, neuromotor, physiological, behavioral, and cognitive deficits that precipitate loss of functional independence and disability.  The central hypothesis of Resource Core-3 (RC-3) Neuromotor Mechanisms and Rehabilitation is that appropriately selected functional activity and exercise-based rehabilitation interventions can promote beneficial changes in brain [central nervous system (CNS) structure, connectivity, and physiology] and neuromotor mechanisms to improve motor performance and function and minimize chronic disability in older people. 

 

RC-3 provides support, guidance, and mentoring to UM-OAIC investigators using a multi-system approach focused on whole-body balance, locomotion, and upper limb activities to address the mechanistic bases upon which to build novel rehabilitation strategies to improve motor function and independence and promote recovery in older people with chronic disease-associated disabilities.  Through this framework, functional activity and exercise-mediated brain and neuromotor plasticity can be identified to guide condition-specific and individual-specific rehabilitation approaches for minimizing disability. The complementary and collaborative relationship between RC-3 and RC-2 -- which focuses on muscle, metabolic, and cardiovascular mechanisms of aging with disability -- forges a strong and comprehensive inter-core synergy for understanding the bases for designing and testing effective new rehabilitation programs to restore and sustain functional independence and quality of living among older individuals.




CAREER DEVELOPMENT
REC Scholar, Research & Grants Funded During Pepper Supported Time Years Publications
 
Tasneem Khambaty, PhD
Assistant Professor / Department of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Depressive Symptoms, Executive Function, and Trajectories of Diabetes Biomarkers: Relations to Functional Status and Race-Related Disparities in the HANDLS study
  • UM-OAIC Pilot Award: Relations of Glucose Variability with Cognitive Function and Functional Status among Older Adults at Risk for Diabetes
  • NIH/NIA Extramural Loan Repayment Program: Depressive Symptoms, Executive Function, and Trajectories of Diabetes Biomarkers: Relations to Functional Status and Race-Related Disparities in the HANDLS study

2018-2021  22 (6 1st/Sr)

Past Scholars
F. Rainer von Coelln, Dr. med, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore (2017-2020)

PILOT/EXPLORATORY PROJECTS (4 Pilot Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: Relations of Glucose Variability with Cognitive Function and Functional Status among Older Adults at Risk for Diabetes
  Leader: Tasneem Khambaty, PhD
 

Abstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is an independent risk factor for dementia and less severe forms of cognitive dysfunction and may compromise functional status. Metrics derived from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology – i.e., glucose variability – may facilitate the detection of impaired glycemia much earlier than the conventional glycemic metrics. We propose a robust characterization of intra- and inter-day variability in glucose regulation and a deeper understanding of the extent to which this variability influences cognitive aging and functional decline in persons at risk for diabetes. Understanding this early aging trajectory is an important step towards discerning the mechanisms underlying various aspects of glycemia and neurocognition.

Hypotheses: Our central hypothesis is that even before diabetes onset, glucose variability will be associated with worse cognitive function and lower functional status among older adults. Our specific aims are to examine the association of glucose variability derived from CGMS over a 10-day self-monitoring period with cognitive function, and functional status among individuals with prediabetes, aged 50 or older.

 
2. Project Title: A combination of ultrasound and CT for investigation of muscle and functional changes in hip OA across the disease spectrum
  Leader: Christa Nelson, PT, DPT, PhD
 

Abstract: Muscle changes, including muscle atrophy and fat infiltration, can impact muscle function and have been observed in the hip muscles in individuals at risk for falls. The extent of muscle adaptation in the hip and lumbar muscles in individuals at various stages of hip osteoarthritis is not yet fully known, despite hip OA being a common cause of disability in older adults. This study proposes to utilize multiple imaging methods, including CT and ultrasound imaging, to quantify muscle adaptation in the hip and lumbar spine in individuals with and without hip osteoarthritis. In addition, we will correlate imaging findings to measures of balance, strength, and function as measured with the Short Physical Performance Battery, the Four-Square step test, Biodex strength testing, and the 30-second chair stand test.

Hypotheses: We hypothesize that muscle atrophy and fat infiltration in the hip and lumbar muscles will be higher in the affected hip compared to that of healthy controls. Additionally, we hypothesize that the amount of muscle atrophy and fat infiltration will correlate to the disease severity, where individuals with more severe hip osteoarthritis will have significantly more muscle atrophy and fat infiltration than those in earlier stages of the disease.

 
3. Project Title: Immune mechanisms responsible for the impaired B cell responses to new antigens in the elderly
  Leader: Franklin Toapanta, PhD
  Abstract: Development of humoral responses to new antigens are impaired in older adults (>65 years). Alterations at multiple levels of the immune system are likely implicated and, to date, there is little information about the intrinsic B cell factors responsible for the poor antibody responses in older adults. We have used Hepatitis B virus vaccination as a model to study potential alterations on B cell responses. We hypothesized that older adults, compared to young adults, have a reduced pool of circulating antigen-specific B cells to novel antigens. Furthermore, we hypothesized that in older adults, antigen-specific B memory cells induced by vaccination will have reduced antibody production capacity due to higher activation thresholds. These studies were proposed to be carried out in cryopreserved specimens (PBMC) of volunteers vaccinated with Recombivax-HB (HBV vaccine).
 
4. Project Title: Home Exercise (HEX) for Homebound Older Adults
  Leader: Alyssa Stookey, PhD
 

Abstract:Little is known about the feasibility and utility of pragmatic home-based exercise in older homebound adults with severe mobility disability. We propose a feasibility study to design and implement a pragmatic 12-week home exercise program (HEX) intervention program to improve physical functioning and quality of life in homebound older adults with mobility disability.

Hypothesis: Our general hypothesis is HEX will prove feasible and effective in maintaining and restoring physical functioning and perceived quality of life. Aim #1: We will work with providers and patients to develop a feasible and pragmatic, multi-component home exercise program targeting mobility, strength, and performance of task-oriented ADLs. Aim #2: Perform a small study to better assess feasibility and determine the effect(s) of the home-based intervention created in Aim 1 on functional outcomes and QOL(at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks) in older, homebound adults.

 
DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (0 Development Projects Listed)
  No development projects.
RESEARCH (25 Projects Listed)
1. Project Title: EXERCISE TRAINING, CACS, AND VASCULAR FUNCTION IN OLDER VETERANS WITH IGT
  Leader(s): PRIOR, STEVEN J
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX000730 / (2013-2017)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Overweight, older Veterans with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes and its macro- and microvascular complications. Impaired circulating angiogenic cell (CAC) mobilization and reduced CAC function may contribute to the development of vascular complications in IGT because CACs participate in angiogenesis and vascular...
 
2. Project Title: PREVENTING DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS THROUGH MANIPULATING THE SKIN MICROBIOTA
  Leader(s): ROGHMANN, MARY-CLAIRE
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001601 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  Diabetes is common in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient population with a prevalence of24% making it a priority clinical issue for Veterans. Between 10 and 25% of people with diabetes will develop afoot ulcer during their lifetime. Diabetic foot ulcers are a leading cause of hospitalization, as well as the primarycause of lower limb amputations. About 5% of patients with a foot ulce...
 
3. Project Title: ASYMPTOMATIC CAROTID STENOSIS: COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND PLAQUE CORRELATES - 2
  Leader(s): LAL, BRAJESH K
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01CX001621 / (2017-2021)
  Core(s):
  Vascular cognitive impairment is an insidious disease resulting from accumulated ischemic injury to thebrain. Our VA Merit-funded Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis and Cognitive Function (ACCOF) found that in thesetting of carotid stenosis, alterations of behavior can occur in the absence of physical manifestations ofstroke. Otherwise asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis had worse cognitive per...
 
4. Project Title: DEVELOPING A BRAIN-MACHINE INTERFACE FOR AN ANKLE ROBOT
  Leader(s): FORRESTER, LARRY
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX000592 / (2012-2014)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This proposal builds on recent advances in using noninvasive electroencephalograhy (EEG) to capture brain activation patterns that can be used to control computers and/or devices. The potential to use such brain-computer (BCI) or brain-machine interfaces (BMI) in physical rehabilitation is now a real possibility with the co-evolution of technologically so...
 
5. Project Title: ROLE OF A NOVEL EXERCISE PROGRAM TO PREVENT POST-THROMBOTIC SYNDROME
  Leader(s): LAL, BRAJESH K
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX000995 / (2014-2021)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Despite standard care, 25%-50% of patients with acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) progress to chronic post- thrombotic syndrome (PTS) resulting in significant disability, loss of productivity, and healthcare costs. This is a problem encountered frequently among our numerous Veterans undergoing surgery, anesthesia, traumatic and acute injury, and surgical c...
 
6. Project Title: RESISTIVE TRAINING COMBINED WITH NUTRITIONAL THERAPY AFTER STROKE
  Leader(s): RYAN, ALICE S.; IVEY, FREDERICK M. ;
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX001461 / (2015-2020)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Background: Our VA research team has played a prominent role in documenting the significant skeletal muscle atrophy that accompanies chronic hemiparesis after disabling stroke. Muscle volume is reduced by 24% in paretic vs. non-paretic legs, having significant implications for strength, function, fitness, metabolism and general health. Our previou...
 
7. Project Title: ADAPTIVE ANKLE ROBOT CONTROL SYSTEM TO REDUCE FOOT-DROP IN CHRONIC STROKE
  Leader(s): KITTNER, STEVEN J
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX001699 / (2015-2020)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This proposal investigates a novel ankle robot (anklebot) adaptive control approach integrated with treadmill training to reduce foot drop and improve mobility function in chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors. Currently, stroke survivors with foot drop are trained to live with a cane or othr assistive device, and often ankle foot orthotics (AFO's)...
 
8. Project Title: MULTIMODAL EXERCISE AND WEIGHT LOSS IN OLDER VETERANS WITH DYSMOBILITY
  Leader(s): KATZEL, LESLIE I.
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I01RX001813 / (2016-2020)
  Core(s):
  Background: Obesity is a major risk factor for mobility limitation in older adults. It is estimated that 11 millionolder adults have mobility disability and > 4 million older adults use walking assistive devices. Mobility disabilityresults in decreased economy of gait, physical deconditioning and reduced peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak).Impaired economy of gait and decreased physiological reserve m...
 
9. Project Title: POST-REVASCULARIZATION REHABILITATION TO IMPROVE FUNCTION IN VETERANS WITH PAD
  Leader(s): PRIOR, STEVEN J
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I21RX001927 / (2016-2018)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Peripheral artery disease (PAD) and its associated declines in physical function impair quality of life (QOL) in nearly 20% of older veterans and result in substantial VA health care costs. Revascularization addresses the anatomical pathology, but does not restore mobility function and QOL. Optimal therapy may require post- revascularization rehabi...
 
10. Project Title: PROGRESSIVE ACTIVITY-BASED REHABILITATION IN VETERAN CANCER SURVIVORS WITH CHRONIC PAIN
  Leader(s): RYAN, ALICE S.
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA I21RX002870 / (2018-2020)
  Core(s):
  Veterans are at a higher risk for lung cancer and so early detection, treatment, and symptommanagement are critical. Treatment for lung cancer in those with early stage local disease includes surgeryand chemotherapy. However, persistent or chronic neuropathic pain, either post-thoracotomy persistent pain(PTPP) or chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) occurs in a majority of patients. T...
 
11. Project Title: EXERCISE AND WEIGHT LOSS TO IMPROVE MOBILITY FUNCTION IN VETERANS WITH PAD
  Leader(s): ADDISON, ODESSA
    BALTIMORE VA MEDICAL CENTER
    VA IK2RX001788 / (2016-2021)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects an estimated 12 -15 million adults in the US and an estimated 20% of older Veterans. Those with PAD ambulate with slow gait and experience decreased leg strength, dysmobility, reduced quality of life, serious morbidity and often premature death. It is estimated that over 60% of individuals with PAD are overweight or obese. While PAD...
 
12. Project Title: MODULATION OF INTERHEMISPHERIC INTERACTIONS AND ARM ACTIVITY AFTER STROKE
  Leader(s): DIMYAN, MICHAEL
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH K23NS088107 / (2014-2019)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This K23 application is submitted by Michael A. Dimyan, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine. My long-term goal is to become an independent clinical investigator focusing on the neural substrates of arm motor control as a basis for developing interventions to improve neurorehabilitation after stroke. This K23 aw...
 
13. Project Title: CLAUDE D. PEPPER OLDER AMERICANS INDEPENDENCE CENTER
  Leader(s): GOLDBERG, ANDREW P
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH P30AG028747 / (2006-2016)
  Core(s):
  The mission of the UM-OAIC is to determine and evaluate the mechanisms and efficacy of motor learning based exercise rehabilitation that focuses on the restoration and maintenance of function, and the prevention of the functional decline that puts older adults with chronic diseases at risk for disability. This will be accomplished by 1) conducting basic and clinical translational research that exa...
 
14. Project Title: COMMUNITY AMBULATION FOLLOWING HIP FRACTURE
  Leader(s): MAGAZINER, JAY
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01AG035009 / (2010-2019)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The ability to ambulate in the community is of critical importance for carrying out daily activities; yet 50% of hip fracture patients who walked independently before a fracture require assistance to walk 10 feet a year later, and many of those that are able to walk without assistance move so slowly that they are no longer able to walk a distance considered a...
 
15. Project Title: NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM CLINICAL TRIAL (N-TA^3CT )
  Leader(s): TERRIN, MICHAEL L.; BAXTER, BERNARD TIMOTHY ; CURCI, JOHN A ; MATSUMURA, JON STEVEN ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01AG037120 / (2011-2020)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a common (2-5% of the population e 65 years: 4-9% men; 0.5- 1.5% women) and lethal problem causing 15,000 deaths annually from rupture in the U.S. The only accepted treatment is repair of the AAA which is performed for 40,000 large AAA annually in the U.S. With recent, widespread screening, many more small (<5.0 cm in men, <...
 
16. Project Title: COMBINING TESTOSTERONE THERAPY AND EXERCISE TO IMPROVE FUNCTION POST HIP FRACTURE
  Leader(s): BINDER, ELLEN F; KIEL, DOUGLAS P. ; MAGAZINER, JAY ; ORWIG, DENISE L ; SCHECHTMAN, KENNETH B. ; SCHWARTZ, ROBERT S ; VOLPI, ELENA ;
    WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
    NIH R01AG051647 / (2017-2022)
  Core(s):
  Hip fractures are common among older women and can have a devastating impact on their ability toremain independent. A clinically important functional decline and failure to recover following a hip fracture hasbeen documented as much as a year after the fracture, even among individuals who were functioning at highlevels before the event. Age-associated androgen deficiency in women contributes to de...
 
17. Project Title: HIP MUSCLE POWER, LATERAL BALANCE FUNCTION, AND FALLS IN AGING
  Leader(s): GRAY, VICKI L.
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01AG060051 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  Project Summary/Abstract Falls and their consequences are among the major problems in the medical care of older individuals.The long-term goal of this research is to a mechanistically derived therapeutic intervention to enhance musclepower, weight-shifting capability, and lateral balance to prevent falls. When human balance is challenged,protective stepping is a vital strategy for preventing a fal...
 
18. Project Title: EFFECTS OF EARLY EXERCISE ON MUSCLE AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AFTER STROKE
  Leader(s): MACKO, RICHARD FRANK; FORRESTER, TERRENCE G ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R01HD068712 / (2011-2017)
  Core(s):
  DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Stroke leads to profound physical deconditioning and abnormalities in paretic leg muscle including shift to fast twitch muscle phenotype, inflammation and gross atrophy that worsen cardiometabolic health by promoting insulin resistance. Yet, no prior studies have considered stroke as a catabolic syndrome in aging that can be modified by early exercise to improv...
 
19. Project Title: INFLUENCE OF ATTENTIONAL CONTROL ON PROTECTIVE ARM RESPONSES TO BALANCE PERTURBATIONS IN OLDER ADULTS.
  Leader(s): WESTLAKE, KELLY
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R03AG060290 / (2018-2020)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY As a leading cause of fatal and non- fatal injuries in older individuals, falls are a significant health concern and one of the most feared consequences of aging. Although numerous rehabilitation interventions have been developed to improve balance in older adults, these improvements do not effectively reduce the incidence of falls and fall related in...
 
20. Project Title: NEUROMUSCULAR AND BIOMECHANICAL CONTROL OF LOWER LIMB LOADING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE
  Leader(s): GRAY, VICKI L.
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R21AG060034 / (2018-2020)
  Core(s):
  Project Summary/AbstractStroke is the leading cause of long-term disability is the U.S. Individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke oftenhave difficulty bearing weight on the paretic lower extremity and transferring weight from one leg to the other.Impaired weight transfer and limb loading contribute to lateral instability and are associated with decreasedwalking speed and increased risk of falling...
 
21. Project Title: EXERCISE EFFECT ON CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED NEUROPATHIC PAIN, PERIPHERAL NERVE FIBERS
  Leader(s): RYAN, ALICE S.; GRIFFITH, KATHLEEN A ;
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R21HD091696 / (2016-2019)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY There are over 14 million cancer survivors in the United States, many of whom suffer from chemotherapy- induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) as a late effect of neurotoxic chemotherapy. CIPN presents as bilateral numbness and tingling in the hands and feet and typically progresses to include neuropathic pain. CIPN- related neuropathic pain (CIPN-NP) develops during chemotherapy a...
 
22. Project Title: ADVANCING GERIATRICS INFRASTRUCTURE & NETWORK GROWTH (AGING) INITIATIVE
  Leader(s): GURWITZ, JERRY H
    UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS MED SCH WORCESTER
    NIH R33AG057806 / (2018-2023)
  Core(s):
  PROJECT SUMMARY / ABSTRACTThe Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN)-Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs)AGING (Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth) Initiative, funded under an R24 grantmechanism (R24 AG045050), was initiated in 2014 to foster collaborations between HCSRN and OAIC (akaPepper Centers) investigators in order to advance an interdisciplinary research a...
 
23. Project Title: EFFECTS OF MULTI-MODAL EXERCISE INTERVENTION POST HIP FRACTURE
  Leader(s): MAGAZINER, JAY
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH R37AG009901 / (2011-2019)
  Core(s):
  This proposed Merit Extension will continue a line of research initiated In 1983 that has evolved into an internationally recognized program, the Baltimore Hip Studies (BHS), dedicated to identifying, developing, and evaluating strategies to optimize recovery following hip fracture. This Merit Extension, which has two components, will extend findings from prior Merit Award studies and other BHS pr...
 
24. Project Title: RESEARCH TRAINING IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF AGING.
  Leader(s): MAGAZINER, JAY
    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
    NIH T32AG000262 / (1998-2023)
  Core(s):
  AbstractThe aging of the United States population highlights the need for increased interdisciplinary research on diseasesand disabilities that affect older persons. The objective of years 21 25 of this successful program is to continuetraining 5 pre- and 2 postdoctoral fellows to conduct independent and original research in the epidemiology ofaging, with an emphasis on the prevention of late li...
 
25. Project Title: DEVELOPING AN NIA RESEARCH CENTERS COLLABORATIVE NETWORK (RCCN)
  Leader(s): KRITCHEVSKY, STEPHEN B.; LEDERMAN, STEPHANIE ;
    WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES
    NIH U24AG058556 / (2018-2021)
  Core(s):
  Project Summary/AbstractThe problems associated with an aging society transcend the boundaries of any specificdiscipline and play out across multiple biologic and societal domains ranging from individualcells, to organs and organ systems, to persons, to communities, to national and worldeconomies. The six National Institute on Aging center programs address important topics inaging but typically th...
 
PUBLICATIONS
2021
 
2020
  1. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and High-Protein Supplementation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Badjatia N, Sanchez S, Judd G, Hausladen R, Hering D, Motta M, Parikh G, Chang W, Morris N, Simard JM, Sorkin J, Wittenberg GF, Ryan AS
    Neurocrit Care, 2020 Nov 4
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-020-01138-4 | PMID: 33150572
    Citations: | AltScore: 26.85
  2. Effect of Doxycycline on Aneurysm Growth Among Patients With Small Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Baxter BT, Matsumura J, Curci JA, McBride R, Larson L, Blackwelder W, Lam D, Wijesinha M, Terrin M, N-TA3CT Investigators.
    JAMA, 2020 May 26, 323(20): 2029-2038
    https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.5230 | PMID: 32453369 | PMCID: PMC7251450
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 159.35
  3. An Outreach Rehabilitation Program for Nursing Home Residents after Hip Fracture may be Cost-Saving.
    Beaupre LA, Lier D, Magaziner JS, Jones CA, Johnston DWC, Wilson DM, Majumdar SR
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Mar 26, 75(10): e159-e165
    pii: glaa074. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa074 | PMID: 32215562
    Citations: | AltScore: 5.8
  4. Vitamin D, Folate, and Cobalamin Serum Concentrations Are Related to Brain Volume and White Matter Integrity in Urban Adults.
    Beydoun MA, Shaked D, Hossain S, Beydoun HA, Katzel LI, Davatzikos C, Gullapalli RP, Seliger SL, Erus G, Evans MK, Zonderman AB, Waldstein SR
    Front Aging Neurosci, 2020, 12: 140
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2020.00140 | PMID: 32523528 | PMCID: PMC7261885
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  5. A Propensity Score Matched Study of the Positive Impact of Infectious Diseases Consultation on Antimicrobial Appropriateness in Hospitalized Patients with Antimicrobial Stewardship Oversight.
    Bork JT, Claeys KC, Heil EL, Banoub M, Leekha S, Sorkin JD, Kleinberg M
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 2020 Jul 22, 64(8):
    pii: e00307-20. https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00307-20 | PMID: 32423952 | PMCID: PMC7526803
    Citations: | AltScore: 19.4
  6. The relationship between sleep-disordered breathing, blood pressure, and urinary cortisol and catecholamines in children.
    Brooks DM, Kelly A, Sorkin JD, Koren D, Chng SY, Gallagher PR, Amin R, Dougherty S, Guo R, Marcus CL, Brooks LJ
    J Clin Sleep Med, 2020 Jun 15, 16(6): 907-916
    https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.8360 | PMID: 32043963
    Citations: | AltScore: 1
  7. Putative Cut-Points in Sarcopenia Components and Incident Adverse Health Outcomes: An SDOC Analysis.
    Cawthon PM, Manini T, Patel SM, Newman A, Travison T, Kiel DP, Santanasto AJ, Ensrud KE, Xue QL, Shardell M, Duchowny K, Erlandson KM, Pencina KM, Fielding RA, Magaziner J, Kwok T, Karlsson M, Ohlsson C, Mellstr?m D, Hirani V, Ribom E, Correa-de-Araujo R, Bhasin S
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Jul, 68(7): 1429-1437
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16517 | PMID: 32633824 | PMCID: PMC7508260
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2.5
  8. Comparing Longitudinal Sarcopenia Trends by Definitions Across Men and Women After Hip Fracture.
    Chiles Shaffer N, Huang Y, Abraham DS, Cheng YJ, Lu W, Gruber-Baldini AL, Hochberg MC, Guralnik J, Magaziner J, Orwig D
    J Am Geriatr Soc, 2020 Apr 1, 68(7): 1537-1544
    https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16417 | PMID: 32239496 | PMCID: PMC7416476
    Citations: | AltScore: 8.43
  9. High prevalence of chronic venous disease among health care workers in the United States.
    Cires-Drouet RS, Fangyang L, Rosenberger S, Startzel M, Kidwell M, Yokemick J, McDonald T, Carlin M, Sharma J, Sorkin JD, Lal BK
    J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord, 2020 Mar, 8(2): 224-230
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvsv.2019.10.017 | PMID: 32067727 | PMCID: PMC7375188
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  10. Two Approaches to Classifying and Quantifying Physical Resilience in Longitudinal Data.
    Col?n-Emeric C, Pieper CF, Schmader KE, Sloane R, Bloom A, McClain M, Magaziner J, Huffman KM, Orwig D, Crabtree DM, Whitson HE
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Mar 9, 75(4): 731-738
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glz097 | PMID: 30993327 | PMCID: PMC7328208
    Citations: 3 | AltScore: NA
  11. The SENIEUR protocol and the efficacy of hepatitis B vaccination in healthy elderly persons by age, gender, and vaccine route.
    Edelman R, Deming ME, Toapanta FR, Heuser MD, Chrisley L, Barnes RS, Wasserman SS, Blackwelder WC, Handwerger BS, Pasetti M, Siddiqui KM, Sztein MB
    Immun Ageing, 2020, 17: 9
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12979-020-00179-9 | PMID: 32355503 | PMCID: PMC7187507
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: NA
  12. Application of Selected Muscle Strength and Body Mass Cut Points for the Diagnosis of Sarcopenia in Men and Women With or at Risk for HIV Infection.
    Erlandson KM, Travison TG, Zhu H, Magaziner J, Correa-de-Araujo R, Cawthon PM, Bhasin S, Manini T, Fielding RA, Palella FJ, Kingsley L, Lake JE, Sharma A, Tien PC, Weber KM, Yin MT, Brown TT
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Jun 18, 75(7): 1338-1345
    https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa083 | PMID: 32301484 | PMCID: PMC7302174
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 2.6
  13. Contraction Phase and Force Differentially Change Motor Evoked Potential Recruitment Slope and Interhemispheric Inhibition in Young Versus Old.
    Ermer E, Harcum S, Lush J, Magder LS, Whitall J, Wittenberg GF, Dimyan MA
    Front Hum Neurosci, 2020, 14: 581008
    https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.581008 | PMID: 33132888 | PMCID: PMC7573560
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  14. Lateral Perturbation-Induced and Voluntary Stepping in Fallers and Nonfallers After Stroke.
    Gray VL, Fujimoto M, Rogers MW
    Phys Ther, 2020 Jun 12, 100(9): 1557-1567
    pii: pzaa109. https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzaa109 | PMID: 32529236 | PMCID: PMC7608778
    Citations: | AltScore: 2.1
  15. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is associated with mobility and cognitive dysfunction and heightens falls in older adults.
    Gray VL, Goldberg AP, Rogers MW, Anthony L, Terrin ML, Guralnik JM, Blackwelder WC, Lam DFH, Sikdar S, Lal BK
    J Vasc Surg, 2020 Jun, 71(6): 1930-1937
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2019.09.020 | PMID: 31699511 | PMCID: PMC7196504
    Citations: 2 | AltScore: 10.65
  16. Mimickers of Hill-Sachs Lesions.
    Herring A, Davis DL
    Can Assoc Radiol J, 2020 Feb 6 846537119895751
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0846537119895751 | PMID: 32063021 | PMCID: PMC7415664
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.5
  17. A Robust Impedance Controller Design for Series Elastic Actuators using the Singular Perturbation Theory.
    Kim D, Koh K, Cho GR, Zhang LQ
    IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron, 2020 Feb, 25(1): 164-174
    https://doi.org/10.1109/tmech.2019.2951417 | PMID: 32431485 | PMCID: PMC7236756
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  18. Relations of Executive Function and Physical Performance in Middle Adulthood: A Prospective Investigation in African American and White Adults.
    Leibel DK, Williams MR, Katzel LI, Evans MK, Zonderman AB, Waldstein SR
    J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci, 2020 Jun 2, 75(6): e56-e68
    https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa012 | PMID: 31993650 | PMCID: PMC7265814
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  19. Aerobic Exercise Recommendations to Optimize Best Practices in Care After Stroke: AEROBICS 2019 Update.
    MacKay-Lyons M, Billinger SA, Eng JJ, Dromerick A, Giacomantonio N, Hafer-Macko C, Macko R, Nguyen E, Prior P, Suskin N, Tang A, Thornton M, Unsworth K
    Phys Ther, 2020 Jan 23, 100(1): 149-156
    https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzz153 | PMID: 31596465
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 24.95
  20. The incidence of persistent postoperative opioid use among U.S. veterans: A national study to identify risk factors.
    Namiranian K, Siglin J, Sorkin JD
    J Clin Anesth, 2021 Feb, 68: 110079
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2020.110079 | PMID: 33010491 | PMCID: PMC7750291
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  21. Postoperative opioid misuse in patients with opioid use disorders maintained on opioid agonist treatment.
    Namiranian K, Siglin J, Sorkin JD, Norris EJ, Aghevli M, Covington EC
    J Subst Abuse Treat, 2020 Feb, 109: 8-13
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2019.10.007 | PMID: 31856954 | PMCID: PMC7416727
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 0.25
  22. Effects of Proximity between Companion Dogs and Their Caregivers on Heart Rate Variability Measures in Older Adults: A Pilot Study.
    Ortmeyer HK, Katzel LI
    Int J Environ Res Public Health, 2020 Apr 13, 17(8):
    pii: E2674. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082674 | PMID: 32295094 | PMCID: PMC7215279
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 14.8
  23. Application of SDOC Cut-points for Low Muscle Strength for Recovery of Walking Speed After Hip Fracture.
    Orwig D, Magaziner J, Fielding RA, Zhu H, Binder EF, Cawthon PM, Bhasin S, Correa-de-Araujo R, Manini T, Patel S, Shardell M, Travison TG
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 Apr 3, 75(7): 1379-1385
    pii: glaa076. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa076 | PMID: 32242218 | PMCID: PMC7302178
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 8.95
  24. Biomarkers Associated with Physical Resilience After Hip Fracture.
    Parker DC, Coln-Emeric C, Huebner JL, Chou CH, Kraus VB, Pieper CF, Sloane R, Whitson HE, Orwig D, Crabtree DM, Magaziner J, Bain JR, Muehlbauer M, Ilkayeva OR, Huffman KM
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2020 May 9, 75(10): e166-e172
    pii: glaa119. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa119 | PMID: 32386291 | PMCID: PMC7518564
    Citations: | AltScore: 1.25
  25. Selection Bias, Orthopaedic Style: Knowing What We Don't Know About Aspirin.
    Pellegrini VD Jr, Eikelboom J, McCollister Evarts C, Franklin PD, Goldhaber SZ, Iorio R, Lambourne CA, Magaziner JS, Magder LS, Steering Committee of The PEPPER Trial.
    J Bone Joint Surg Am, 2020 Apr 1, 102(7): 631-633
    https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.19.01135 | PMID: 31895235 | PMCID: PMC7289131
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 16.9
  26. Neurocognitive measures predict voluntary stepping performance in older adults post-hip fracture.
    Pizac DA, Savin DN, Orwig D, Gruber-Baldini A, Creath R, Conroy V, Hochberg M, Beamer BA, Magaziner J, Rogers MW
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), 2020 Nov 12 105234
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2020.105234 | PMID: 33213932
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  27. Depression Subtypes in Individuals With or at Risk for Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis.
    Rathbun AM, Schuler MS, Stuart EA, Shardell MD, Yau MS, Gallo JJ, Ryan AS, Hochberg MC
    Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken), 2020 May, 72(5): 669-678
    https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23898 | PMID: 30951261 | PMCID: PMC7176152
    Citations: 4 | AltScore: 10.25
  28. Association between disease progression and depression onset in persons with radiographic knee osteoarthritis.
    Rathbun AM, Shardell MD, Ryan AS, Yau MS, Gallo JJ, Schuler MS, Stuart EA, Hochberg MC
    Rheumatology (Oxford), 2020 Apr 24, 59(11): 3390-3399
    pii: keaa141. https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keaa141 | PMID: 32333000 | PMCID: PMC7590406
    Citations: | AltScore: 4.85
  29. Role of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction in CKD.
    Ryan AS
    Clin J Am Soc Nephrol, 2020 Jul 1, 15(7): 912-913
    https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.08050520 | PMID: 32591420 | PMCID: PMC7341784
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 2.5
  30. Physical performance measures in older women with urinary incontinence: pelvic floor disorder or geriatric syndrome?
    Sanses TVD, Pearson S, Davis D, Chen CCG, Bentzen S, Guralnik J, Richter HE, Ryan AS
    Int Urogynecol J, 2020 Nov 17
    https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-020-04603-y | PMID: 33201269
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  31. Changes in circulating microRNA and arterial stiffness following high-intensity interval and moderate intensity continuous exercise.
    Sapp RM, Chesney CA, Eagan LE, Evans WS, Zietowski EM, Prior SJ, Hagberg JM, Ranadive SM
    Physiol Rep, 2020 May, 8(9): e14431
    https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14431 | PMID: 32358919 | PMCID: PMC7195557
    Citations: 1 | AltScore: 0.75
  32. Dietary and Serum Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acids Are Associated with Physical and Metabolic Function in Stroke Survivors.
    Serra MC, Ryan AS, Hafer-Macko CE, Yepes M, Nahab FB, Ziegler TR
    Nutrients, 2020 Mar 6, 12(3):
    pii: E701. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030701 | PMID: 32155696 | PMCID: PMC7146193
    Citations: | AltScore: 0.5
  33. Incidence of Postoperative Opioid Overdose and New Diagnosis of Opioid Use Disorder Among US Veterans.
    Siglin J, Sorkin JD, Namiranian K
    Am J Addict, 2020 Jul, 29(4): 295-304
    https://doi.org/10.1111/ajad.13022 | PMID: 32202000 | PMCID: PMC7416726
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  34. Reducing Inpatient Hypoglycemia in the General Wards Using Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring: The Glucose Telemetry System, a Randomized Clinical Trial.
    Singh LG, Satyarengga M, Marcano I, Scott WH, Pinault LF, Feng Z, Sorkin JD, Umpierrez GE, Spanakis EK
    Diabetes Care, 2020 Nov, 43(11): 2736-2743
    https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0840 | PMID: 32759361 | PMCID: PMC7576426
    Citations: 3 | AltScore: 50.5
  35. Association of glucose variability at the last day of hospitalization with 30-day readmission in adults with diabetes.
    Spanakis EK, Singh LG, Siddiqui T, Sorkin JD, Notas G, Magee MF, Fink JC, Zhan M, Umpierrez GE
    BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care, 2020 May, 8(1):
    pii: e000990. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2019-000990 | PMID: 32398351 | PMCID: PMC7222883
    Citations: | AltScore: NA
  36. Ambulatory Status Is Associated With Successful Discharge Home in Survivors of Critical Illness.
    Tran DH, Maheshwari P, Nagaria Z, Patel HY, Verceles AC
    Respir Care, 2020 Mar 31, 65(8): 1168-1173
    pii: respcare.07437. https://doi.org/10.4187/respcare.07437 | PMID: 32234767 | PMCID: PMC7538008
    Citations: | AltScore: 6.4
  37. Vitamin K Intake in Chronic Stroke: Implications for Dietary Recommendations.
    Wessinger C, Hafer-Macko C, S Ryan A
    Nutrients, 2020 Oct 6, 12(10):
    pii: E3059. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103059 | PMID: 33036224 | PMCID: PMC7599637
    Citations: | AltScore: 19.05
  38. Kynurenines link chronic inflammation to functional decline and physical frailty.
    Westbrook R, Chung T, Lovett J, Ward C, Joca H, Yang H, Khadeer M, Tian J, Xue QL, Le A, Ferrucci L, Moaddel R, de Cabo R, Hoke A, Walston J, Abadir PM
    JCI Insight, 2020 Aug 20, 5(16):
    pii: 136091. https://doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.136091 | PMID: 32814718 | PMCID: PMC7455140
    Citations: | AltScore: 34.1


EXTERNAL ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS

Thomas M. Gill, MD
Yale University
Serving since 2006 (15 years)

Bret Goodpaster, PhD
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Karen Bandeen-Roche, PhD
Johns Hopkins University
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Mark Redfern, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Stephen Kritchevsky, PhD (chair)
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Serving since 2011 (10 years)

Cynthia Boyd, MD, MPH
Johns Hopkins University
Serving since 2016 (5 years)

LaDora Thompson, PhD, PT
Boston University
Serving since 2018 (3 years)


RECOGNITION AND AWARDS (2020-2021)
Tasneem Khambaty, PhD (2020)
  • Early Stage Investigator Fellowship Award from the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research

MINORITY RESEARCH

General Brief Description of Minority Activities:
Not defined.


Minority Trainee(s):
  • Alan Rathbun, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore
    Dr. Rathbun is a musculoskeletal epidemiologist whose current research career is focused in musculoskeletal disorders, epidemiological theory, research study design, causal inference, and applied biostatistics. He currently has a K01 award and collaborating with OAIC investigators on this project.
  • Danielle Beatty Moody, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Dr. Beatty Moody’s area of interest includes relations of early life social disadvantage and perceived discrimination to cardiometabolic and brain health endpoints as a function of race, SES, gender and age. Dr. Shari Waldstein is her department mentor and primary mentor for Dr. Moody’s current K01 (see details below). This year she received a diversity supplement funded from NIA through the OAIC.
  • Derik Davis, MD, Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore
    Dr. Davis’ current research career is focused in musculoskeletal radiology examining the effects of increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced skeletal muscle (SMM) on cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and functional outcomes in older adults. He collaborates with Claude D. Pepper OAIC studies performing radiology imaging and reading with Dr. Alice Ryan. He also currently has a Diversity Supplement funded from NIA through the OAIC.
  • Dongwon Kim, PhD, Visiting Post-Doctoral Fellow of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Dr. Kim’s area of interest includes rehabilitation robotics and is currently working with Dr. Li-Qun Zhang, in his laboratory in bioengineering and in his Neuromechanics Lab in SOM, UMB. Dr. Kim is also part of the University of Maryland Baltimore Institute for Clinical & Translational Research (ICTR) / Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Postdoctoral Fellowship, which supports him to be a clinical research scholar and also taking courses to finish a master degree in area of clinical research.
  • Eduardo Alsina, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Mr. Alsina's interests include disparities in the relations of cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., left ventricular mass) to cognitive function and magnetic resonance imaging assessed subclinical brain pathology as a function of race and socioceoncomic status. His master's thesis examined interactive relations left ventricular mass and sociodemographic factors on cognitive outcomes in urban-dwelling African American and White adults. Dr. Shari Waldstein currently serves as his mentor and dissertation chair
  • Peter Maciver, PhD Candidate, PhD Student, Psychology Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County
    Mr. Maciver’s interests include disparities in relations of cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., blood pressure) to cognitive function and MRI-assessed subclinical brain pathology as a function of race and socioeconomic status. His master’s thesis examines relations of arterial stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity) to cognitive function and associated sociodemographic variation. Dr. Shari Waldstein currently serves as his mentor and master’s thesis chair.
  • Rebecca Fenderson, 3rd year medical student, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Ms. Fenderson is working with Dr. Rainer von Coelln on his current research project that is funded by the UM-OAIC entitled “Towards Next-Generation Phenotyping in Parkinson Disease: Quantitative Analysis of Gait and Balance Using a Portable Biosensor Device”. Working on this project with Dr. von Coelln is part of the Foundations of Research and Critical Thinking program, which is a requirement of the SOM.
  • Regina Sims Wright, PhD, Associate Professor of Nursing & Associate Dean of Diversity, University of Delaware
    Dr. Sims Wright's area of interest include race-related disparities in cognitive and brain aging as a function of subclinical vascular disease indices (endothelial function, pulse wave velocity, carotid intimal medial thickening). Dr. Shari Waldstein is primary mentor for her NIGMS project.

Minority Grant(s):